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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2017

Jane Ohlmeyer
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Thomas Bartlett
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen
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Print publication year: 2018

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References

Primary Sources

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Dale, S. F., The Muslim Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals (Cambridge University Press, 2010).Google Scholar
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Ohlmeyer, J., Making Ireland English. The Irish Aristocracy in the Seventeenth Century (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2012).Google Scholar
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Secondary Sources

Akenson, D. H., If the Irish Ran the World: Montserrat, 1630–1730 (Montreal and Kingston; London: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Athar Ali, M., Mughal India. Studies in Polity, Ideas, Society and Culture (Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Bartlett, T., ‘“This Famous Island Set in a Virginian Sea”: Ireland in the British Empire, 1690–1801’, in Marshall, P. J. (ed.), The Oxford History of the British Empire. Vol. II. The Eighteenth Century (Oxford University Press, 1998), 253–75.Google Scholar
Bayly, C. A., ‘Ireland, India and the Empire: 1780–1914’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, sixth series, 10 (2000), 377–97.Google Scholar
Block, K. and Shaw, J., ‘Subjects without an Empire: The Irish in the Early Modern Caribbean’, Past & Present, 210 (2011), 3360.Google Scholar
Canny, N., The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland: A Pattern Established 1565–1576 (Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1976).Google Scholar
Canny, N.Foreword’, in Kenny, K. (ed.), Ireland and the British Empire (Oxford University Press, 2004), ix–xviii.Google Scholar
Canny, N., ‘Ireland and Continental Europe’, in Jackson, Alvin (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History (Oxford University Press, 2014), 333–55.Google Scholar
Canny, N. and Morgan, P. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Atlantic World c.1450–c.1850 (Oxford University Press, 2011).Google Scholar
Cook, S. B., Imperial Affinities: Nineteenth-Century Analogies and Exchanges Between India and Ireland (New Delhi: Sage Publications, 1993).Google Scholar
Crosbie, B., Irish Imperial Networks. Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-century India (Cambridge University Press, 2012).Google Scholar
Cullen, L., ‘The Irish Diaspora of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries’, in Canny, N. (ed.), Europeans on the Move: Studies on European Migration, 1500–1800 (Oxford University Press, 1994), 113–52.Google Scholar
Cunningham, B. and Gillespie, R., ‘The East Ulster Bardic family of Ó Gnímh’, Éigse, 20 (1984), 106–14.Google Scholar
Dale, S. F., The Muslim Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals (Cambridge University Press, 2010).Google Scholar
Elliott, J. H. Empires of the Atlantic World. Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Giacometti, A. and MacGowan, A., Rathfarnham Castle Excavations, 2014 (Dublin: Archaeology Plan, 2015).Google Scholar
Horning, A., Ireland in the Virginian Sea (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, K., ‘Ireland and the British Empire: An introduction’, in Kenny, K. (ed.), Ireland and the British Empire (Oxford University Press, 2004), 115.Google Scholar
Maxwell, C. (ed.), Irish History from Contemporary Sources (1509–1610) (London: Allen & Unwin, 1923).Google Scholar
Moody, T. W., F. X. Martin and F. J. Byrne (eds.), A New History of Ireland III Early Modern Ireland 1554-1691 (Oxford University Press, 1976 and reprinted 2001).Google Scholar
Ohlmeyer, J., Making Ireland English. The Irish Aristocracy in the Seventeenth Century (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2012).Google Scholar
Ohlmeyer, J., ‘The Aristocracy in Seventeenth-century Ireland: Wider Contexts and Comparisons’, History Compass (2014), 3342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ohlmeyer, J., ‘Seventeenth-century Ireland and Scotland and their Wider Worlds’, in O’Connor, T. and Lyons, M. (eds.), Irish Communities in Early Modern Europe (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2006), 457–84.Google Scholar
Ohlmeyer, J., ‘Conquest, Civilization, Colonization: Ireland, 1540–1660’, in Bourke, R. and MacBride, I. (eds.), The Princeton Guide to Modern Irish History (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015), 2247.Google Scholar
Ohlmeyer, J., ‘Eastward Enterprises: Colonial Ireland, Colonial India’, Past & Present (forthcoming, 2018).Google Scholar
Richards, J. F., ‘Fiscal states in Mughal and British India’, in Yun-Casalilla, B. and O’Brien, P. (eds.), The Rise of Fiscal States: a Global History, 1500–1914 (Cambridge University Press, 2012), 410–41.Google Scholar
Storrs, C., ‘Empire and Bureaucracy in the Spanish Monarchy, c.1492–1825’, a paper delivered at a colloquium on ‘Empires and Bureaucracy’, Trinity College Dublin, June 2011.Google Scholar
Whelan, K., ‘Ireland in the World System 1600–1800’, in Nitz, H.-J. (ed.), The Early Modern World-system in Geographical Perspective (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1993), 204–18.Google Scholar
Withington, P., ‘Plantation and Civil Society’, in Ó Ciardha, É. and Ó Siochrú, M. (eds.), The Plantation of Ulster. Ideology and Practice (Manchester University Press, 2012), 5577.Google Scholar
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Brady, C., ‘New English Ideology in Ireland and the two Sir William Herberts’, in Piesse, A. (ed.), Sixteenth Century Identities (Manchester University Press, 2000), 75111.Google Scholar
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Canny, N., Making Ireland British, 1580–1650 (Oxford University Press, 2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Canny, N., ‘The Treaty of Mellifont and the Re-organisation of Ulster, 1603, Irish Sword, 9 (1969–70), 249–62.Google Scholar
Carey, V., Surviving the Tudors: The ‘Wizard’ Earl of Kildare and English Rule in Ireland, 1537–1586 (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002).Google Scholar
Cunningham, B., ‘The Composition of Connacht in the Lordships of Clanricard and Thomond, 1577–1641’, Irish Historical Studies, 24 (1984), 114.Google Scholar
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Heffernan, D.(ed.), ‘Six Tracts on ‘coign and livery’, c.1568–78’, Analecta Hibernica, 45 (2012), 645.Google Scholar
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Bradshaw, B., The Irish Constitutional Revolution of the Sixteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 1979).Google Scholar
Brady, C., The Chief Governors: The Rise and Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland, 1536–1588 (Cambridge University Press, 1994).Google Scholar
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Brady, C., ‘New English Ideology in Ireland and the two Sir William Herberts’, in Piesse, A. (ed.), Sixteenth Century Identities (Manchester University Press, 2000), 75111.Google Scholar
Brady, C., ‘The attainder of Shane O’Neill, Sir Henry Sidney and the Problems of Tudor State-building in Ireland’, in Brady, C. and Ohlmeyer, J. (eds.), British Interventions in Early Modern Ireland (Cambridge University Press, 2005), 2848.Google Scholar
Brady, C., ‘From Policy to Power: the Evolution of Tudor Reform Strategies in Sixteenth-century Ireland’, in MacCuarta, B. (ed.), Reshaping Ireland, 1550–1700: Colonization and its Consequences. Essays Presented to Nicholas Canny (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011), 2142.Google Scholar
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Canny, N., The Elizabethan Conquest of Ireland: a Pattern Established, 1565–76 (Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1976).Google Scholar
Canny, N., Making Ireland British, 1580–1650 (Oxford University Press, 2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Canny, N., ‘The Treaty of Mellifont and the Re-organisation of Ulster, 1603, Irish Sword, 9 (1969–70), 249–62.Google Scholar
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Edwards, D., The Ormond Lordship in County Kilkenny, 1515–1642: the Rise and Fall of Butler Feudal Power (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2003).Google Scholar
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Edwards, D., ‘Beyond Reform: Martial Law and the Tudor Reconquest of Ireland’, History Ireland, 5 (1997), 1621.Google Scholar
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