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11 - Exiles, Convicts, and Deportees as Migrants: Northern Eurasia, Nineteenth–Twentieth Centuries

from Part III - Specialized Migrations and Commercial Diasporas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2023

Marcelo J. Borges
Affiliation:
Dickinson College, Pennsylvania
Madeline Y. Hsu
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
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Summary

Volume 2 of The Cambridge History of Global Migrations presents an authoritative overview of the various continuities and changes in migration and globalization from the 1800s to the present day. Despite revolutionary changes in communication technologies, the growing accessibility of long-distance travel, and globalization across major economies, the rise of nation-states empowered immigration regulation and bureaucratic capacities for enforcement that curtailed migration. One major theme worldwide across the post-1800 centuries was the differentiation between “skilled” and “unskilled” workers, often considered through a racialized lens; it emerged as the primary divide between greater rights of immigration and citizenship for the former, and confinement to temporary or unauthorized migrant status for the latter. Through thirty-one chapters, this volume further evaluates the long global history of migration; and it shows that despite the increased disciplinary systems, the primacy of migration remains and continues to shape political, economic, and social landscapes around the world.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

Further Reading

Anderson, Clare, ed. A Global History of Convicts and Penal Colonies. London: Bloomsbury, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Badcock, Sarah. A Prison without Walls? Eastern Siberian Exile in the Last Years of Tsarism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
David-Fox, Michael, ed. The Soviet Gulag: Evidence, Interpretation, and Comparison. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Dobson, Miriam. Khrushchev’s Cold Summer: Gulag Returnees, Crime, and the Fate of Reform after Stalin. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011.Google Scholar
Gentes, Andrew A. Exile, Murder and Madness in Siberia, 1823–61. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khlevniuk, Oleg and Belokowsky, Simon. “The Gulag and the Non-Gulag as One Interrelated Whole.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 16, 3 (2015), 479498.Google Scholar
Landau, Julia. “Specialists, Spies, ‘Special Settlers’, and Prisoners of War: Social Frictions in the Kuzbass (USSR), 1920–1950.” International Review of Social History 60, 1 (2015), 185205.Google Scholar
Siegelbaum, Lewis H. and Moch, Leslie P. Broad Is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia’s Twentieth Century. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2014.Google Scholar

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