Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-45s75 Total loading time: 0.228 Render date: 2021-11-30T15:19:33.568Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

17 - Aristotle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2008

Get access

Summary

For the history of Greek literature, philosophy, from Aristotle onwards, is important in at least three different ways. First, style and genre: the literary presentation of philosophy, sometimes within the same writer, varies on a scale which may range from what is little more than technical shorthand to highly polished prose. Some philosophers of the Hellenistic period even present their ideas in verse, and quotations, especially from the most famous poets, are not uncommon.

Secondly, literary theory: Aristotle himself, and some later Greek philosophers, made fundamental contributions to the theory of rhetoric and to literary criticism. Much of their work in this field was taken over by later classical writers, especially the Roman rhetoricians, and it has had a continuing influence.

Thirdly, thought. This must be considered when it directly influences the subject matter of literature. In this respect Aristotle is much less significant than the Stoics and Epicureans. The philosophy of Epicurus is Lucretius' theme and Lucretius is a poet of comparable genius to Virgil. But Lucretius is only the most notable of many poets and other writers whose work was strongly influenced by Epicureanism or Stoicism. Today that influence looks decidedly more marked on Roman literature than on Greek. But this is due, at least in part, to the loss of nearly all Greek literature from the last three centuries B.C. There can be little doubt that Stoicism and Epicureanism had a pervasive influence on later Greek culture.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1985

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Cherniss, H. (1935). Aristotle's criticism of presocratic philosophy. Baltimore.
Cooper, L. (1922). An Aristotelian theory of comedy. New York.
Düring, I. (1966). Aristoteles. Darstellung und Interpretatíon seines Denkens. Heidelberg.
Gomme, A. W. (1954b). The Greek attitude to poetry and history. Berkeley & Los Angeles.
Grube, G. M. A. (1965). The Greek and Roman critics. London.
Guthrie, W. K. C. (1957). ‘Aristotle as a historian of philosophy’, J.H.S. 77.Google Scholar
House, H. (1956). Aristotle's Poetics. London.
Jones, J. (1962). On Aristotle and Greek tragedy. London.
Lee, H. D. P. (1948). ‘Place-names and the date of Aristotle's biological works’, C.Q. 42.Google Scholar
Lynch, J. P. (1972). Aristotle's school. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London.
Moraux, P. (1973). Der Aristotelismus bei den Griechen I. Berlin, New York.
Ross, W. D. (1923). Aristotle. London.
3
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×