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3 - A Life-Course Model for the Development of Intimate Partner Violence

from Part I - Introduction and Overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 July 2018

Alexander T. Vazsonyi
Affiliation:
University of Kentucky
Daniel J. Flannery
Affiliation:
Case Western Reserve University, Ohio
Matt DeLisi
Affiliation:
Iowa State University
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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