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8A - Designing Pedagogic Tasks for Refugees Learning English to Enter Universities in the Netherlands

from Part III - The Task Syllabus and Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Mohammad Javad Ahmadian
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Michael H. Long
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, College Park
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Summary

There has been growing awareness that refugees profit from being involved in meaningful activities soon after arriving in their new country of residence. Learning the language of the host country seems to be a priority of many initiatives. Yet, in countries like the Netherlands, highly educated refugees might benefit more from initially improving their academic English, as this provides access to higher education and allows them to (re)enter professional life. Drawing on a small-scale needs analysis, this case study showcases the design and implementation of pedagogic tasks that intend to support refugees learning English in the Netherlands for academic or professional purposes.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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