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Part I - Evolution of Play

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2018

Peter K. Smith
Affiliation:
Goldsmiths, University of London
Jaipaul L. Roopnarine
Affiliation:
Syracuse University, New York
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The Cambridge Handbook of Play
Developmental and Disciplinary Perspectives
, pp. 9 - 122
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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