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6 - Ten Common but Questionable Principles of Multimedia Learning

from Part II - Basic Principles of Multimedia Learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2014

Richard E. Mayer
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara
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Summary

Abstract

The chapter begins with a brief summary and extension of our earlier list of 5 questionable multimedia principles (Clark & Feldon, 2005). We then add 5 more principles that have gained traction in recent years. The goal of the chapter is to provide evidence-based explanations of why each of the 10 principles is problematic and to suggest alternative generalizations that are more firmly based on evidence. The updated questionable beliefs include the expectations that multimedia instruction: (1) yields more learning than live instruction or older media; (2) is more motivating than other instructional media; (3) provides animated pedagogical agents that aid learning; (4) accommodates different learning styles and so maximizes learning for more students; and (5) facilitates student-managed constructivist and discovery approaches that are beneficial to learning. The more recent additions and the focus of this discussion are expectations that multimedia instruction benefits learning by providing: (6) autonomy and control over the sequencing of instruction; (7) higher-order thinking skills; (8) incidental learning of enriching information; (9) interactivity; and (10) an authentic learning environment and activities.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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