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Introduction - Motivation and Its Relation to Learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2019

K. Ann Renninger
Affiliation:
Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania
Suzanne E. Hidi
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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