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Part I - Understanding Consumer Behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2023

Jacob E. Gersen
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Joel H. Steckel
Affiliation:
New York University
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) (2011) Food Labeling; Nutrition Labeling of Standard Menu Items in Restaurants and Similar Retail Food Establishments, 76 Fed. Reg. 19192 (proposed Apr. 6).Google Scholar

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