Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-6b989bf9dc-6f5p8 Total loading time: 0.001 Render date: 2024-04-13T07:51:24.376Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2023

Jacob E. Gersen
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Joel H. Steckel
Affiliation:
New York University
Get access

Summary

This volume emerged from the notion that marketers and lawyers often talk about the same things. They may use different names, but essentially the things they talk about are the same. For example, while marketers talk about brands, lawyers talk about trademarks. However, relatively late in the process of editing this volume, we, as editors, had a somewhat unsettling realization. Throughout the planning and editing process for this book, we had been laboring under, not unrelated, but certainly not identical, views about the domain of marketing and the reach of law. We had no real common understanding of what marketing is, what marketing theory entails, and how the law shapes and governs marketing activities. Such a state of affairs is part of the inevitable risk of bringing together a group of scholars from two distinct disciplines. Fortunately, the realization helped us recognize that both marketing and law are sometimes vessels into which users can pour whatever content they wish. At the start, therefore, we thought it wise to dispense with some misconceptions and offer at least some working definitions of the terms and ideas we encounter in this volume.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×