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25 - Content-Based L2 Teaching

from Part V - Pedagogical Interventions and Approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2019

John W. Schwieter
Affiliation:
Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario
Alessandro Benati
Affiliation:
The University of Hong Kong
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Summary

The focus of this chapter is content-based language teaching (CBLT), a type of instruction that combines the teaching of academic subjects (such as maths, science, and history) and second or additional language (L2) learning. This “two for one” pedagogical approach aims to integrate content and language by providing learners with opportunities to use their developing L2 as they advance their understanding of a particular discipline. Although CBLT emphasizes the use of content, research suggests that L2 success in content-based classrooms depends, among other things, on the degree to which instruction provides opportunities not only for content-focused communication but also for attention to linguistic forms. In this respect, there are different models of content-based approaches, which differ from one another in the degree to which they focus on content versus form.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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