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Part One - Multilingualism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2022

Salikoko Mufwene
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Anna Maria Escobar
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
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The Cambridge Handbook of Language Contact
Volume 2: Multilingualism in Population Structure
, pp. 27 - 254
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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