Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-rfz7g Total loading time: 2.705 Render date: 2022-11-28T23:26:19.269Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Part III - Postcopulatory Adaptations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2022

Todd K. Shackelford
Affiliation:
Oakland University, Michigan
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References

Anderson, K. G. (2006). How well does paternity confidence match actual paternity? Results from worldwide nonpaternity rates. Current Anthropology, 48, 511518.Google Scholar
Baker, R. (2013). Sexual whodunits and evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 243247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, R. R., & Bellis, M. A. (1995). Human sperm competition: Copulation, masturbation, and infidelity. London: Chapman and Hall.Google Scholar
Bruce, H. M. (1959). An exteroceptive block to pregnancy in the mouse. Nature, 105, 184.Google Scholar
Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2004). Pregnancy as a stimulus for domestic violence. Journal of Family Violence, 19, 243247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2019). Abusive men are driven by paternal uncertainty. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 14, 197209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fang, B. (1976). Swinging: In retrospect. The Journal of Sex Research, 12, 220237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., & Ampel, B. C. (2017). Sibling resemblance and the effects of gamete formation, independent reassortment, paternal uncertainty, twining and adoption. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 11, 99101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., & Burch, R. L. (2004). Semen displacement as a sperm competition strategy in humans. Evolutionary Psychology, 2, 1223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., & Burch, R. L. (2006). The semen displacement hypothesis: Semen hydraulics and the intra-pair copulation proclivity model of female infidelity. In Platek, S & Shackelford, T (Eds.), Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty: Evolutionary perspectives on male anti-cuckoldry tactics (pp. 129140). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., & Burch, R. L. (in press). Intimate partner violence and relationship maintenance. In Mogilski, J & Shackelford, T (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of evolutionary psychology and romantic relationships. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Burch, R. L., & Berens Mitchell, T. J. (2006). Semen displacement as a sperm competition strategy: Multiple mating, self-semen displacement, and timing of in-pair copulations. Human Nature, 17, 253264.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Burch, R. L., & Petricone, L. (2012). Sexual conflict, infidelity, and vaginal/semen chemistry. In Shackelford, T & Goetz, A (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of sexual conflict in humans (pp. 217232). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Burch, R. L., Zappieri, M. L., Parvez, R. A., Stockwell, M. L., & Davis, J. A. (2003). The human penis as a semen displacement device. Evolution and Human Behavior, 24, 277289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Finn, M. M., & Sammis, B. (2009). On the origin of descended scrotal testicles: The activation hypothesis. Evolutionary Psychology, 7, 517524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Stolz, J. A., Burch, R. L., & Bremser, J. A. (2019). How evolutionary studies enables people to think outside the box. In Geher, G, Gallup, A. C, & Head, H (Eds.), Evolutionary studies: Darwin’s road map to the curriculum (pp. 321362). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup, G. G., Jr., Towne, J. P., & Stolz, J. A. (2018). An evolutionary perspective on orgasm. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 12, 5269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goetz, A. T., & Shackelford, T. K. (2006). Sexual coercion and forced in-pair copulation as sperm competition tactics in humans. Human Nature, 17, 265282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hughes, S. M., Aung, T., Harrison, M. A., LaFayette, J. N., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2020). Experimental evidence for sex differences in sexual variety preferences: Support for the Coolidge effect in humans. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 50, 495509.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moore, K. L., Persaud, T. V. N., & Torchia, M. G. (2015). Before we are born e-Book: Essentials of embryology and birth defects with STUDENT CONSULT online access. New York, NY: Elsevier Health Sciences.Google Scholar
O’Hara, K., & O’Hara, J. (1999). The effect of male circumcision on the sexual enjoyment of the female partner. British Journal of Urology, International, 83, 7984.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Platek, S. M., Burch, R. L., Panyavin, I. S., Wasserman, B. H., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2002). Reactions to children’s faces: Resemblance matters more for males than females. Evolution and Human Behavior, 23(3), 159166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Platek, S. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (Eds.). (2006). Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty: Evolutionary analysis of anti-cuckoldry tactics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sela, Y., Weekes-Shackelford, V. A., Shackelford, T. K., & Pham, M. N. (2015). Female copulatory orgasm and male partner’s attractiveness to his partner and other women. Personality and Individual Differences, 79, 152156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wachowiak, D., & Bragg, H. (1980). Open marriage and marital adjustment. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 42, 5762.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

Albert, G., & Arnocky, S. (2016). Use of mate retention strategies. New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allen, E. S., & Atkins, D. C. (2005). The multidimensional and developmental nature of infidelity: Practical applications. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 61(11), 13711382.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Anderson, U. S., Perea, E. F., Vaughn Becker, D., Ackerman, J. M., Shapiro, J. R., Neuberg, S. L., & Kenrick, D. T. (2010). I only have eyes for you: Ovulation redirects attention (but not memory) to attractive men. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46(5), 804808.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbaro, N., Pham, M. N., Shackelford, T. K., & Zeigler-Hill, V. (2016). Insecure romantic attachment dimensions and frequency of mate retention behaviors. Personal Relationships, 23(3), 605618.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbaro, N., Sela, Y., Atari, M., Shackelford, T. K., & Zeigler-Hill, V. (2019). Romantic attachment and mate retention behavior: The mediating role of perceived risk of partner infidelity. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 36(3), 940956.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, R. F., & Twenge, J. M. (2002). Cultural suppression of female sexuality. Review of General Psychology, 6(2), 166203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baxter, C. M., Barnett, R., & Dukas, R. (2015). Aggression, mate guarding and fitness in male fruit flies. Animal Behaviour, 109, 235241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bobst, C., & Lobmaier, J. S. (2012). Men’s preference for the ovulating female is triggered by subtle face shape differences. Hormones and Behavior, 62(4), 413417.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brady, A., Baker, L. R., & Miller, R. S. (2020). Look but don’t touch? Self-regulation determines whether noticing attractive alternatives increases infidelity. Journal of Family Psychology, 34(2), 135144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Breuer, T., Robbins, A. M., Boesch, C., & Robbins, M. M. (2012). Phenotypic correlates of male reproductive success in western gorillas. Journal of Human Evolution, 62(4), 466472.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (1988). From vigilance to violence: Tactics of mate retention in American undergraduates. Ethology and Sociobiology, 9(5), 291317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (2002). Human mate guarding. Neuro-Endocrinology Letters, 23 Suppl. 4, 2329.Google ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (2018). Sexual and emotional infidelity: Evolved gender differences in jealousy prove robust and replicable. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 13(2), 155160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (2019). Evolutionary psychology: The new science of the mind (6th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., Larsen, R. J., Westen, D., & Semmelroth, J. (1992). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science, 3(4), 251256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (1993). Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 100(2), 204232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (2019). Mate preferences and their behavioral manifestations. Annual Review of Psychology, 70(1), 77110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (1997). From vigilance to violence: Mate retention tactics in married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72(2), 346361.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buunk, B. P., & Dijkstra, P. (2004). Gender differences in rival characteristics that evoke jealousy in response to emotional versus sexual infidelity. Personal Relationships, 11(4), 395408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, L., & Ellis, B. J. (2015). Commitment, love, and mate retention. In Buss, D. M. (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary psychology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. doi: 10.1002/9780470939376.ch14Google Scholar
Chaudhary, N., Al-Shawaf, L., & Buss, D. M. (2018). Mate competition in Pakistan: Mate value, mate retention, and competitor derogation. Personality and Individual Differences, 130, 141146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cobey, K. D., Buunk, A. P., Pollet, T. V., Klipping, C., & Roberts, S. C. (2013). Men perceive their female partners, and themselves, as more attractive around ovulation. Biological Psychology, 94(3), 513516.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Connidis, I. (2001). Family ties and aging. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Connor, R. C., & Krützen, M. (2015). Male dolphin alliances in Shark Bay: Changing perspectives in a 30-year study. Animal Behaviour, 103, 223235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conroy-Beam, D., Goetz, C. D., & Buss, D. M. (2015). Chapter one – Why do humans form long-term mateships? An evolutionary game-theoretic model. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 51, 139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Daly, M., & Wilson, M. (1988). Evolutionary social psychology and family homicide. Science, 242(4878), 519524.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Daly, M., Wilson, M., & Weghorst, S. J. (1982). Male sexual jealousy. Ethology and Sociobiology, 3(1), 1127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davies, A. P. C., Shackelford, T. K., & Hass, R. G. (2007). When a “poach” is not a poach: Re-defining human mate poaching and re-estimating its frequency. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36(5), 702716.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Miguel, A., & Buss, D. M. (2011). Mate retention tactics in Spain: Personality, sex differences, and relationship status. Journal of Personality, 79(3), 563586.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dillon, L., Nowak, N., Shattuck, K., Weisfeld, G., Weisfeld, C., Imamoğlu, E., … & Jiliang, S. (2014). When the cat’s away, the spouse will play: A cross-cultural examination of mate guarding in married couples. Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 12(2–4), 97108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Druckerman, P. (2007). Lust in translation: The rules of infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee. London: Penguin Press.Google Scholar
Elias, D. O., Sivalinghem, S., Mason, A. C., Andrade, M. C., & Kasumovic, M. M. (2014). Mate-guarding courtship behaviour: Tactics in a changing world. Animal Behaviour, 97, 2533.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernandez, A. M., Vera-Villarroel, P., Sierra, J. C., & Zubeidat, I. (2007). Distress in response to emotional and sexual infidelity: Evidence of evolved gender differences in Spanish students. Null, 141(1), 1724.Google ScholarPubMed
Fife, S. T., Weeks, G. R., & Gambescia, N. (2008). Treating infidelity: An Integrative approach. The Family Journal, 16(4), 316323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fincham, F. D., & May, R. W. (2017). Infidelity in romantic relationships. Current Opinion in Psychology, 13, 7074.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Flinn, M. V. (1988). Mate guarding in a Caribbean village. Ethology and Sociobiology, 9(1), 128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foster, J. D., Jonason, P. K., Shrira, I., Keith Campbell, W., Shiverdecker, L. K., & Varner, S. C. (2014). What do you get when you make somebody else’s partner your own? An analysis of relationships formed via mate poaching. Journal of Research in Personality, 52, 7890.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gangestad, S. W., Thornhill, R., & Garver, C. E. (2002). Changes in women’s sexual interests and their partner’s mate-retention tactics across the menstrual cycle: Evidence for shifting conflicts of interest. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 269(1494), 975982.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Geary, D. C. (2010). Male, female: The evolution of human sex differences (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goetz, A. T., & Shackelford, T. K. (2006). Sexual coercion and forced in-pair copulation as sperm competition tactics in humans. Human Nature, 17(3), 265282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goetz, A. T., Shackelford, T. K., Romero, G. A., Kaighobadi, F., & Miner, E. J. (2008). Punishment, proprietariness, and paternity: Men’s violence against women from an evolutionary perspective. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 13(6), 481489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goetz, A. T., Shackelford, T. K., Weekes-Shackelford, V. A., Euler, H. A., Hoier, S., Schmitt, D. P., & LaMunyon, C. W. (2005). Mate retention, semen displacement, and human sperm competition: A preliminary investigation of tactics to prevent and correct female infidelity. Personality and Individual Differences, 38(4), 749763.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guerrero, L. K., Spitzberg, B. H., & Yoshimura, S. M. (2004). Sexual and emotional jealousy. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Hayward, A., & Gillooly, J. F. (2011). The cost of sex: Quantifying energetic investment in gamete production by males and females. PLoS One, 6(1), e16557. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016557CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henrich, J., Boyd, R., & Richerson, P. J. (2012). The puzzle of monogamous marriage. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367(1589), 657669.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Holley, A., Shalev, S., Bellevue, S., & Pfaus, J. G. (2014). Conditioned mate-guarding behavior in the female rat. Physiology & Behavior, 131, 136141.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jankowiak, W. R., & Fischer, E. F. (1992). A cross-cultural perspective on romantic love. Ethnology, 31(2), 149155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jonason, P. K., Cetrulo, J. F., Madrid, J. M., & Morrison, C. (2009). Gift-giving as a courtship or mate-retention tactic? Insights from non-human models. Evolutionary Psychology, 7(1). doi: 10.1177/147470490900700112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaighobadi, F., & Shackelford, T. K. (2008). Female attractiveness mediates the relationship between in-pair copulation frequency and men’s mate retention behaviors. Personality and Individual Differences, 45(4), 293295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaighobadi, F., Shackelford, T. K., & Goetz, A. T. (2014). From mate retention to murder: Evolutionary psychological perspectives on men’s partner-directed violence. Review of General Psychology, 13(4). doi: 10.1037/a0017254Google Scholar
Kaighobadi, F., Starratt, V. G., Shackelford, T. K., & Popp, D. (2008). Male mate retention mediates the relationship between female sexual infidelity and female-directed violence. Personality and Individual Differences, 44(6), 14221431.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kardum, I., Knežević, J. H., & Gračanin, A. (2006). Sociosexuality and mate retention in romantic couples. Psychological Topics, 15(2), 277296.Google Scholar
Kenagy, G. J., & Trombulak, S. C. (1986). Size and function of mammalian testes in relation to body size. Journal of Mammalogy, 67(1), 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kennair, L. E. O., Wyckoff, J. P., Asao, K., Buss, D. M., & Bendixen, M. (2018). Why do women regret casual sex more than men do? Personality and Individual Differences, 127, 6167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., & Trost, M. R. (2004). Evolutionary approaches to relationships. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Kleiman, D. G. (1977). Monogamy in mammals. The Quarterly Review of Biology, 52(1), 3969.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Komiya, A., Ohtsubo, Y., Nakanishi, D., & Oishi, S. (2019). Gift-giving in romantic couples serves as a commitment signal: Relational mobility is associated with more frequent gift-giving. Evolution and Human Behavior, 40(2), 160166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, N. P., Bailey, J. M., Kenrick, D. T., & Linsenmeier, J. A. W. (2002). The necessities and luxuries of mate preferences: Testing the tradeoffs. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(6), 947955.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lopes, G. S., Shackelford, T. K., Santos, W. S., Farias, M. G., & Segundo, D. S. A. (2016). Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF): Adaptation to the Brazilian context. Personality and Individual Differences, 90, 3640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marlowe, F. (2004). Mate preferences among Hadza hunter-gatherers. Human Nature, 15(4), 365376.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCullough, M. E., Kurzban, R., & Tabak, B. A. (2013). Putting revenge and forgiveness in an evolutionary context. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 36(1), 4158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mikton, C. R., Butchart, A., Dahlberg, L. L., & Krug, E. G. (2016). Global status report on violence prevention 2014. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 50(5), 652659.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, S. L., & Maner, J. K. (2009). Sex differences in response to sexual versus emotional infidelity: The moderating role of individual differences. Personality and Individual Differences, 46(3), 287291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miner, E. J., Starratt, V. G., & Shackelford, T. K. (2009). It’s not all about her: Men’s mate value and mate retention. Personality and Individual Differences, 47(3), 214218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Næss, S., Blekesaune, M., & Jakobsson, N. (2015). Marital transitions and life satisfaction: Evidence from longitudinal data from Norway. Acta Sociologica, 58(1), 6378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oliver, M. B., & Hyde, J. S. (1993). Gender differences in sexuality: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 114(1), 2951.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Owen, J., & Fincham, F. D. (2011). Young adults’ emotional reactions after hooking up encounters. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(2), 321330.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Packer, C., Gilbert, D. A., Pusey, A. E., & O’Brien, S. J. (1991). A molecular genetic analysis of kinship and cooperation in African lions. Nature, 351(6327), 562565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Petersen, J. L., & Hyde, J. S. (2010). A meta-analytic review of research on gender differences in sexuality, 1993–2007. Psychological Bulletin, 136(1), 21–38.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Piemonte, J. L., Conley, T. D., & Gusakova, S. (2019). Orgasm, gender, and responses to heterosexual casual sex. Personality and Individual Differences, 151, 109487. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2019.06.030CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pillsworth, E. G., & Haselton, M. G. (2006). Male sexual attractiveness predicts differential ovulatory shifts in female extra-pair attraction and male mate retention. Evolution and Human Behavior, 27(4), 247258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prokop, P., & Pazda, A. D. (2016). Women’s red clothing can increase mate-guarding from their male partner. Personality and Individual Differences, 98, 114117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Puts, D. (2016). Human sexual selection. Current Opinion in Psychology, 7, 2832.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reichel, D. (2017). Determinants of intimate partner violence in Europe: The role of socioeconomic status, inequality, and partner behavior. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 32(12), 18531873.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Salmon, C. (2017). Long-term romantic relationships: Adaptationist approaches. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 11(2), 121130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scelza, B. A. (2014). Jealousy in a small-scale, natural fertility population: The roles of paternity, investment and love in jealous response. Evolution and Human Behavior, 35(2), 103108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. P. (2004). Patterns and universals of mate poaching across 53 nations: The effects of sex, culture, and personality on romantically attracting another person’s partner. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86(4), 560584.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmitt, D. P., & Buss, D. M. (2001). Human mate poaching: Tactics and temptations for infiltrating existing mateships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80(6), 894917.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schülke, O., Heistermann, M., & Ostner, J. (2014). Lack of evidence for energetic costs of mate-guarding in wild male Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis). International Journal of Primatology, 35(3), 677700.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwarz, S., & Hassebrauck, M. (2012). Sex and age differences in mate-selection preferences. Human Nature, 23(4), 447466.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seidelmann, K. (2015). Double insurance of paternity by a novel type of mating plug in a monandrous solitary mason bee Osmia bicornis (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 115(1), 2837.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shackelford, T. K. (2003). Preventing, correcting, and anticipating female infidelity: Three adaptive problems of sperm competition. Evolution and Cognition, 9(2), 9096. Retrieved from www.toddkshackelford.com/downloads/Shackelford-EC-2003.pdfGoogle Scholar
Shackelford, T. K., Goetz, A. T., Buss, D. M., Euler, H. A., & Hoier, S. (2005). When we hurt the ones we love: Predicting violence against women from men’s mate retention. Personal Relationships, 12(4), 447463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Starratt, V. G., Shackelford, T. K., Goetz, A. T., & Mckibbin, W. F. (2007). Male mate retention behaviors vary with risk of partner infidelity and sperm competition. Acta Psychologica Sinica, 39(3), 523527.Google Scholar
Tafoya, M. A., & Spitzberg, B. H. (2007). The dark side of infidelity: Its nature, prevalence, and communicative functions. The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication, 2, 201242.Google Scholar
Thornhill, R., & Alcock, J. (1983). The evolution of insect mating systems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trivers, R. (1972). Parental investment and sexual selection. In Campbell, B. (Ed.), Sexual selection and the descent of man, 1871–1971 (pp. 136179). Chicago, IL: Aldine.Google Scholar
Wade, T., Mogilski, J., & Schoenberg, R. (2018). Sex differences in reconciliation behavior after romantic conflict. Evolutionary Psychological Science, 4(1), 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walter, K. V., Conroy-Beam, D., Buss, D. M., & Asao, K. (2020). Sex differences in mate preferences across 45 countries: A large-scale replication. Psychological Science, 31(4), 116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Watts, D. P. (1998). Coalitionary mate guarding by male chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 44(1), 4355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
White, G. L. (1981). A model of romantic jealousy. Motivation and Emotion, 5(4), 295310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilkins, R., Laß, I., Butterworth, P., & Vera-Toscano, E. (2019). The household, income and labour dynamics in Australia survey: Selected findings from waves 1 to 17. Melbourne: Melbourne Institute, Applied Economic & Social Research, University of Melbourne. Retrieved from https://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/3127664/HILDA-Statistical-Report-2019.pdfGoogle Scholar
Wilson, E. O. (1975). Sociobiology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Wilson, M., & Daly, M. (1993). An evolutionary psychological perspective on male sexual proprietariness and violence against wives. Violence and Victims, 8(3), 271294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wood, B. M., & Marlowe, F. W. (2013). Household and kin provisioning by Hadza men. Human Nature, 24(3), 280317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wyckoff, G. J., Wang, W., & Wu, C. (2000). Rapid evolution of male reproductive genes in the descent of man. Nature, 403(6767), 304309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zuo, B., Wen, F., & Wu, Y. (2019). Sex differences in mate retention and mate quality enhancement: The effect of facial sexual dimorphism cues on willingness to introduce a new friend to one’s partner. Archives of Sexual Behaviour, 48, 17851794.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Abbey, A. (1982). Sex differences in attributions for friendly behavior: Do males misperceive females’ friendliness? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 42, 830838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apicella, C. L., Little, A. C., & Marlowe, F. W. (2007). Facial averageness and attractiveness in an isolated population of hunter-gatherers. Perception, 36(12), 18131820.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arnocky, S. (2018). Self-perceived mate value, facial attractiveness, and mate preferences: Do desirable men want it all? Evolutionary Psychology, 16(1). doi: 10.1177/1474704918763271CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, R., & Bellis, M. A. (1995). Human sperm competition: Copulation, masturbation and infidelity. Netherlands: Springer Netherlands.Google Scholar
Barber, N. (1995). The evolutionary psychology of physical attractiveness: Sexual selection and human morphology. Evolution and Human Behavior, 16, 395424.Google Scholar
Baudouin, J. Y., & Tiberghien, G. (2004). Symmetry, averageness, and feature size in the facial attractiveness of women. Acta Psychologica, 117(3), 313332.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bernstein, I. H., Lin, T., & McClellan, P. (1983). Cross- vs. within-racial judgements of attractiveness. Perception and Psychophysics, 32(6), 495503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E., & Walster, E. (1974). Physical attractiveness. In Berkowitz, L. (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 7, pp. 157215). New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Bobst, C., & Lobmaier, J. S. (2014). Is preference for ovulatory females’ faces associated with men’s testosterone levels? Hormones and Behavior, 66(3), 487492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brand, R. J., Markey, C. M., Mills, A., & Hodges, S. D. (2007). Sex differences in self-reported infidelity and its correlates. Sex Roles, 57(1–2), 101109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burch, R. L., Moran, J. B., & Wade, T. J. (2021). The reproductive priming effect revisited: Mate poaching, mate copying, or both? Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 15(3), 251–264. doi: 10.1037/ebs0000232CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burch, R. L., & Widman, D. R. (2021). The point of nipple erection 1: The experience and projection of perceived emotional states while viewing women with and without erect nipples. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 15(3), 305–311. doi: 10.1037/ebs0000244CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (1989). Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12(1), 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (1994). The evolution of desire. New York, NY: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (1993). Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 100(2), 204232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (1997). From vigilance to violence: Mate retention tactics in married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72(2), 346361.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Byrne, D., Griffitt, W., & Stefaniak, D. (1967). Attraction and similarity of personality characteristics. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 5(1), 8290.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carroll, J. L. (2018). Sexuality now: Embracing diversity. New York, NY: Cengage Learning.Google Scholar
Cherney, E. F., & Bermant, G. (1970). The role of stimulus female novelty in the rearousal of copulation in male laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus). Animal Behaviour, 18, 567574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cobey, K. D., Buunk, A. P., Pollet, T. V., Klipping, C., & Roberts, S. C. (2013). Men perceive their female partners, and themselves, as more attractive around ovulation. Biological Psychology, 94(3), 513516.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Conroy-Beam, D., & Buss, D. M. (2019). Why is age so important in human mating? Evolved age preferences and their influences on multiple mating behaviors. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 13(2), 127157.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cunningham, M. R., Roberts, A. R., Wu, C., Barbee, A. P., & Druen, P. B. (1995). Their ideas of beauty are, on the whole, the same as ours: Consistency and variability in the cross-cultural perception of female physical attractiveness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 68(2), 261279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dainton, M., & Gross, J. (2008). The use of negative behaviors to maintain relationships. Communication Research Reports, 25, 179191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Danel, D. P., Kalinowski, K., Nowak-Szczepanska, N., Ziomkiewicz-Wichary, A., Apanasewicz, A., Borysławski, K., … & Fedurek, P. (2020). Shifts in female facial attractiveness during pregnancy. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(14), 5176. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17145176CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dewsbury, D. A. (1981). Effects of novelty on copulatory behavior: The Coolidge effect and related phenomena. Psychological Bulletin, 89(3), 464482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dion, K. K., Berscheid, E., & Walster, E. (1972). What is beautiful is good. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 24, 285290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dixson, B. J., Duncan, M., & Dixson, A. F. (2015). The role of breast size and areolar pigmentation in perceptions of women’s sexual attractiveness, reproductive health, sexual maturity, maternal nurturing abilities, and age. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 44(6), 16851695.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dixson, B. J., Grimshaw, G. M., Linklater, W. L., & Dixson, A. F. (2011). Eye tracking of men’s preferences for female breast size and areola pigmentation. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(1), 5158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Durante, K. M., Li, N. P., & Haselton, M. G. (2008). Changes in women’s choice of dress across the ovulatory cycle: Naturalistic and laboratory task-based evidence. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34(11), 14511460.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eva, K. W., & Wood, T. J. (2006). Are all the taken men good? An indirect examination of mate-choice copying in humans. Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), 175(12), 15731574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feinberg, D. R., Jones, B. C., Smith, M. L., Moore, F. R., DeBruine, L. M., Cornwell, R. E., … & Perrett, D. I. (2006). Menstrual cycle, trait estrogen level, and masculinity preferences in the human voice. Hormones and Behavior, 49(2), 215222.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Feingold, A. (1990). Gender differences in effects of physical attractiveness on romantic attraction: A comparison across five research paradigms. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59(5), 981993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernandes, H. B. F., Kennair, L. E. O., Hutz, C. S., Natividade, J. C., & Kruger, D. J. (2016). Are negative postcoital emotions a product of evolutionary adaptation? Multinational relationships with sexual strategies, reputation, and mate quality. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 10(4), 219244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fink, B., Matts, P. J., Klingenberg, H., Kuntze, S., Weege, B., & Grammer, K. (2008). Visual attention to variation in female facial skin color distribution. Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 7(2), 155161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fink, B., Neave, N., Manning, J. T., & Grammer, K. (2006). Facial symmetry and judgements of attractiveness, health and personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 41(3), 491499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fink, B., Weege, B., Manning, J. T., & Trivers, R. (2014). Body symmetry and physical strength in human males. American Journal of Human Biology, 26(5), 697700.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fischer, J., Semple, S., Fickenscher, G., Jürgens, R., Kruse, E., Heistermann, M., & Amir, O. (2011). Do women’s voices provide cues of the likelihood of ovulation? The importance of sampling regime. PLoS One, 6(9), e24490. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024490CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fleischmann, A. A., Spitzberg, B. H., Anderson, P. A., & Roesch, S. C. (2005). Tickling the monster: Jealousy induction in relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 22(1), 4973.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foo, Y. Z., Simmons, L. W., & Rhodes, G. (2017). Predictors of facial attractiveness and health in humans. Scientific Reports, 7, 39731. doi: 10.1038/srep39731CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frevert, T. K., & Walker, L. S. (2014). Physical attractiveness and social status. Sociology Compass, 8(3), 313323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frisby, B. N., & Booth-Butterfield, M. (2012). The “how” and “why” of flirtatious communication between marital partners. Communication Quarterly, 60(4), 465480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., & Swami, V. (2007). Perception of female buttocks and breast size in profile. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal, 35(1), 18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furnham, A., Dias, M., & McClelland, A. (1998). The role of body weight, waist-to-hip ratio, and breast size in judgments of female attractiveness. Sex Roles, 39(3–4), 311326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gangestad, S. W., & Thornhill, R. (1997a). The evolutionary psychology of extrapair sex: The role of fluctuating asymmetry. Evolution and Human Behavior, 18, 6988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gangestad, S. W., & Thornhill, R. (1997b). Human sexual selection and developmental stability. In Simpson, J. A. & Kenrick, D. T. (Eds.), Evolutionary social psychology (pp. 169195). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Gangestad, S. W., Thornhill, R., & Yeo, R. A. (1994). Facial attractiveness, developmental stability, and fluctuating asymmetry. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15(2), 7385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garza, R., Pazhoohi, F., & Byrd-Craven, J. (2020). Does ecological harshness influence men’s perceptions of women’s breast size, ptosis, and intermammary distance? Evolutionary Psychological Science, 7(2), 110.Google Scholar
Gildersleeve, K. A., Haselton, M. G., Larson, C. M., & Pillsworth, E. G. (2012). Body odor attractiveness as a cue of impending ovulation in women: Evidence from a study using hormone-confirmed ovulation. Hormones and Behavior, 61(2), 157166.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Givens, D. B. (1978). The nonverbal basis of attraction: Flirtation, courtship, and seduction. Psychiatry, 41(4), 346359.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Graham, C. A., Janssen, E., & Sanders, S. A. (2000). Effects of fragrance on female sexual arousal and mood across the menstrual cycle. Psychophysiology, 37(1), 7684.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grammer, K., & Thornhill, R. (1994). Human (Homo sapiens) facial attractiveness and sexual selection: The role of symmetry and averageness. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 108, 233242.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grammer, K., Renninger, L., & Fischer, B. (2004). Disco clothing, female sexual motivation, and relationship status: Is she dressed to impress? Journal of Sex Research, 41(1), 6674.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gray, P. B., & Frederick, D. A. (2012). Body image and body type preferences in St. Kitts, Caribbean: A cross-cultural comparison with US samples regarding attitudes towards muscularity, body fat, and breast size. Evolutionary Psychology, 10(3). doi: 10.1177/147470491201000319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grillot, R. L., Simmons, Z. L., Lukaszewski, A. W., & Roney, J. R. (2014). Hormonal and morphological predictors of women’s body attractiveness. Evolution and Human Behavior, 35(3), 176183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haselton, M. G. (2003). The sexual overperception bias: Evidence of a systematic bias in men from a survey of naturally occurring events. Journal of Research in Personality, 37(1), 3447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haselton, M. G., & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error management theory: A new perspective on biases in cross-sex mind reading. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78(1), 8191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haselton, M. G., & Buss, D. M. (2001). The affective shift hypothesis: The functions of emotional changes following sexual intercourse. Personal Relationships, 8(4), 357369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haselton, M. G., Mortezaie, M., Pillsworth, E. G., Bleske-Rechek, A., & Frederick, D. A. (2007). Ovulatory shifts in human female ornamentation: Near ovulation, women dress to impress. Hormones and Behavior, 51(1), 4045.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Havlíček, J., Dvořáková, R., Bartoš, L., & Flegr, J. (2006). Non‐advertised does not mean concealed: Body odour changes across the human menstrual cycle. Ethology, 112(1), 8190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Havlíček, J., Roberts, S. C., & Flegr, J. (2005). Women’s preference for dominant male odour: Effects of menstrual cycle and relationship status. Biology Letters, 1(3), 256259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Havlíček, J., Třebický, V., Valentova, J. V., Kleisner, K., Akoko, R. M., Fialová, J., … & Varella, M. A. C. (2017). Men’s preferences for women’s breast size and shape in four cultures. Evolution and Human Behavior, 38(2), 217226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henningsen, D. D. (2004). Flirting with meaning: An examination of miscommunication in flirting interactions. Sex Roles, 50(7–8), 481489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, S. E., & Buss, D. M. (2008). The mere presence of opposite-sex others on judgments of sexual and romantic desirability: Opposite effects for men and women. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34, 635647.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hoffmann, H. (2019). The aroma of arousal: Effects of menstrual cycle phase and women’s sexual arousal state on men’s responsiveness to women’s body odor. Biological Psychology, 142, 5461.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hogan, P. C. (2015). The idiosyncrasy of beauty: Aesthetic universals and the diversity of taste. In Bundgaard, P. F. & Stjernfelt, F. (Eds.), Investigations into the phenomenology and the ontology of the work of art (pp. 109127). Cham: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hughes, S. M., Aung, T., Harrison, M. A., LaFayette, J. N., & Gallup, G. G. (2020). Experimental evidence for sex differences in sexual variety preferences: Support for the Coolidge effect in humans. Archives of Sexual Behavior. doi: 10.1007/s10508-020-01730-xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hughes, S. M., & Kruger, D. J. (2011). Sex differences in post-coital behaviors in long- and short-term mating: An evolutionary perspective. Journal of Sex Research, 48(5), 496505.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hunt, L. L., Eastwick, P. W., & Finkel, E. J. (2015). Leveling the playing field: Longer acquaintance predicts reduced assortative mating on attractiveness. Psychological Science, 26(7), 10461053.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnston, V. S., Hagel, R., Franklin, M., Fink, B., & Grammer, K. (2001). Male facial attractiveness: Evidence for hormone-mediated adaptive design. Evolution and Human Behavior, 22(4), 251267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, D., & Hill, K. (1993). Criteria of facial attractiveness in five populations. Human Nature, 4(3), 271296.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kenrick, D. T., Gutierres, S. E., & Goldberg, L. L. (1989). Influence of popular erotica on judgments of strangers and mates. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 25(2), 159167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., & Keefe, R. C. (1992). Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in human reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15(1), 7591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., Keefe, R. C., Gabrielidis, C., & Cornelius, J. S. (1996). Adolescents’ age preferences for dating partners: Support for an evolutionary model of life‐history strategies. Child Development, 67(4), 14991511.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kenrick, D. T., Neuberg, S. L., Zierk, K. L., & Krones, J. M. (1994). Evolution and social cognition: Contrast effects as a function of sex, dominance, and physical attractiveness. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 20(2), 210217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kirchengast, S., & Gartner, M. (2002). Changes in fat distribution (WHR) and body weight across the menstrual cycle. Collegium Antropologicum, 26, 4757.Google ScholarPubMed
Komori, M., Kawamura, S., & Ishihara, S. (2009). Averageness or symmetry: Which is more important for facial attractiveness? Acta Psychologica, 131(2), 136142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kościński, K. (2019). Breast firmness is of greater importance for women’s attractiveness than breast size. American Journal of Human Biology, 31(5), e23287. doi: 10.1002/ajhb.23287CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koukounas, E., & Over, R. (2000). Changes in the magnitude of the eyeblink startle response during habituation of sexual arousal. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38(6), 573584.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kuukasjärvi, S., Eriksson, C. J., Koskela, E., Mappes, T., Nissinen, K., & Rantala, M. J. (2004). Attractiveness of women’s body odors over the menstrual cycle: the role of oral contraceptives and receiver sex. Behavioral Ecology, 15(4), 579584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Langlois, J. H., Kalakanis, L., Rubenstein, A. J., Larson, A., Hallam, M., & Smoot, M. (2000). Maxims or myths of beauty? A meta-analytic and theoretical review. Psychological Bulletin, 126(3), 390423.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lassek, W. D., & Gaulin, S. J. (2019). Evidence supporting nubility and reproductive value as the key to human female physical attractiveness. Evolution and Human Behavior, 40(5), 408419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, N. P., Yong, J. C., Tov, W., Sng, O., Fletcher, G. J. O., Valentine, K. A., … & Balliet, D. (2013). Mate preferences do predict attraction and choices in the early stages of mate selection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105(5), 757776.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Little, A. C., Burriss, R. P., Jones, B. C., DeBruine, L. M., & Caldwell, C. A. (2008). Social influence in human face preference: Men and women are influenced more for long-term than short-term attractiveness decisions. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29, 140146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Little, A. C., & Jones, B. C. (2003). Evidence against perceptual bias views for symmetry preferences in human faces. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 270(1526), 17591763.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luscombe, B. (2008). Why we flirt. Time, 171(4), 6265.Google ScholarPubMed
Lynn, M. (2009). Determinants and consequences of female attractiveness and sexiness: Realistic tests with restaurant waitresses. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 38(5), 737745.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ma-Kellams, C., Wang, M. C., & Cardiel, H. (2017). Attractiveness and relationship longevity: Beauty is not what it is cracked up to be. Personal Relationships, 24(1), 146161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Manning, J. T., Scutt, D., Whitehouse, G. H., & Leinster, S. J. (1997). Breast asymmetry and phenotypic quality in women. Evolution and Human Behavior, 18(4), 223236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marlowe, F. (1998). The nubility hypothesis. Human Nature, 9(3), 263271.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McBurney, D. H., Zapp, D. J., & Streeter, S. A. (2005). Preferred number of sexual partners: Tails of distributions and tales of mating systems. Evolution and Human Behavior, 26(3), 271278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McNulty, J. K., Baker, L. R., & Olson, M. A. (2014). Implicit self-evaluations predict changes in implicit partner evaluations. Psychological Science, 25(8), 16491657.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McNulty, J. K., O’Mara, E. M., & Karney, B. R. (2008). Benevolent cognitions as a strategy of relationship maintenance: “Don’t sweat the small stuff” … But it is not all small stuff. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(4), 631646.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meltzer, A. L., Makhanova, A., Hicks, L. L., French, J. E., McNulty, J. K., & Bradbury, T. N. (2017). Quantifying the sexual afterglow: The lingering benefits of sex and their implications for pair-bonded relationships. Psychological Science, 28(5), 587598.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meltzer, A. L., & McNulty, J. K. (2010). Body image and marital satisfaction: Evidence for the mediating role of sexual frequency and sexual satisfaction. Journal of Family Psychology, 24(2), 156164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meltzer, A. L., & McNulty, J. K. (2019). Relationship formation and early romantic relationships. In Schoebi, D. & Campos, B. (Eds.), New directions in the psychology of close relationships: A brief introduction (pp. 927). Oxon: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Meltzer, A. L., McNulty, J. K., Jackson, G. L., & Karney, B. R. (2014). Sex differences in the implications of partner physical attractiveness for the trajectory of marital satisfaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106, 418428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Messman, S. J., Canary, D. J., & Hause, K. S. (2000). Motives to remain platonic, equity, and the use of maintenance strategies in opposite-sex friendships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 17, 6794.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Møller, A. P., & Swaddle, J. P. (1997). Asymmetry, developmental stability and evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Moran, J. B., Kuhle, B. X., Wade, T. J., & Seid, M. A. (2017). To poach or not to poach? Men are more willing to short-term poach mated women who are more attractive than their mates. EvoS Journal: The Journal of Evolutionary Studies Consortium, 8, 5869.Google Scholar
Moran, J. B., & Wade, T. J. (2019). Self-perceived success in mate poaching: How a couple’s attractiveness and relationship duration impact men’s short-term poaching intentions. Human Ethology, 34, 2640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moran, J. B., & Wade, T. J. (2022). Perceptions of a mismatched couple: The role of attractiveness on mate poaching and copying. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 16(1), 94–99. doi: 10.1037/ebs0000187CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morton, H., & Gorzalka, B. B. (2015). Role of partner novelty in sexual functioning: A review. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 41(6), 593609.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muise, A., Giang, E., & Impett, E. A. (2014). Post sex affectionate exchanges promote sexual and relationship satisfaction. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 43(7), 13911402.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
O’Donohue, W., & Plaud, J. J. (1991). The long-term habituation of sexual arousal in the human male. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 22(2), 8796.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oliver‐Rodríguez, J. C., Guan, Z., & Johnston, V. S. (1999). Gender differences in late positive components evoked by human faces. Psychophysiology, 36(2), 176185.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pazhoohi, F., Arantes, J., Kingstone, A., & Pinal, D. (2020). Waist to hip ratio and breast size modulate the processing of female body silhouettes: An EEG study. Evolution and Human Behavior, 41(2), 150169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Penton-Voak, I. S., Jones, B. C., Little, A. C., Baker, S., Tiddeman, B., Burt, D. M., & Perrett, D. I. (2001). Symmetry, sexual dimorphism in facial proportions and male facial attractiveness. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 268, 16171623.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Penton-Voak, I. S., & Perrett, D. I. (2000). Female preference for male faces changes cyclically: Further evidence. Evolution and Human Behavior, 21(1), 3948.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Penton-Voak, I. S., Perrett, D. I., Castles, D. L., Kobayashi, T., Burt, D. M., Murray, L. K., & Minamisawa, R. (1999). Menstrual cycle alters face preference. Nature, 399(6738), 741742.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peters, M., Simmons, L. W., & Rhodes, G. (2009). Preferences across the menstrual cycle for masculinity and symmetry in photographs of male faces and bodies. PLoS One, 4(1), e4138. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004138CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pietruski, P., Paskal, W., Paskal, A. M., Jaworowski, J., Paluch, L., & Noszczyk, B. (2019). Analysis of the visual perception of female breast aesthetics and symmetry: An eye-tracking study. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 144(6), 12571266.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pipitone, R. N., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2008). Women’s voice attractiveness varies across the menstrual cycle. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(4), 268274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pizzari, T., Cornwallis, C. K., Lovlie, H., Jakobssen, S., & Birkhead, T. R. (2003). Sophisticated sperm allocation in male fowl. Nature, 426, 7074.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Platek, S. M., Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G. (2001). The reproductive priming effect. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal, 29, 245248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plaud, J. J., Gaither, G. A., Henderson, S. A., & Devitt, M. K. (1997). The long-term habituation of sexual arousal in human males: A crossover design. The Psychological Record, 47(3), 385398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pond, C. M. (1978). Morphological aspects and the ecological and mechanical consequences of fat deposition in wild vertebrates. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 9, 519570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Probst, F., Bobst, C., & Lobmaier, J. S. (2016). Testosterone-to-oestradiol ratio is associated with female facial attractiveness. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69(1). doi: 10.1080/17470218.2015.1024696CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prokop, P., Zvaríková, M., Zvarík, M., & Fedor, P. (2020). Cues of pregnancy decrease female physical attractiveness for males. Current Psychology, 18. doi: 10.1007/s12144–020-00608-4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pruett-Jones, S. (1992). Independent versus nonindependent mate choice: Do females copy each other? American Naturalist, 140, 10001009.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Puts, D. A. (2005). Mating context and menstrual phase affect women’s preferences for male voice pitch. Evolution and Human Behavior, 26(5), 388397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rätsch, C. (1997). Plants of love: Aphrodisiacs in myth, history, and the present. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press.Google Scholar
Rhodes, G., Hickford, C., & Jeffery, L. (2000). Sex-typicality and attractiveness: Are supermale and superfemale faces super-attractive? British Journal of Psychology, 91, 125140.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rhodes, G., Simmons, L. W., & Peters, M. (2005). Attractiveness and sexual behavior: Does attractiveness enhance mating success? Evolution and Human Behavior, 26(2), 186201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rhodes, G., Yoshikawa, S., Clark, A., Lee, K., McKay, R., & Akamatsu, S. (2001). Attractiveness of facial averageness and symmetry in non-Western cultures: In search of biologically based standards of beauty. Perception, 30(5), 611625.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rhodes, G., Yoshikawa, S., Palermo, R., Simmons, L. W., Peters, M., Lee, K., … & Crawford, J. R. (2007). Perceived health contributes to the attractiveness of facial symmetry, averageness, and sexual dimorphism. Perception, 36(8), 12441252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rhodes, G., Zebrowitz, L. A., Clark, A., Kalick, S. M., Hightower, A., & McKay, R. (2001). Do facial averageness and symmetry signal health? Evolution and Human Behavior, 22(1), 3146.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robinson, J. E., & Short, R. V. (1977). Changes in breast sensitivity at puberty, during the menstrual cycle, and at parturition. British Medical Journal, 1(6070), 11881191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rodeheffer, C. D., Proffitt Leyva, R. P., & Hill, S. E. (2016). Attractive female romantic partners provide a proxy for unobservable male qualities: The when and why behind human female mate choice copying. Evolutionary Psychology, 14(2). doi: 10.1177/1474704916652144CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roney, J. R., & Simmons, Z. L. (2012). Men smelling women: Null effects of exposure to ovulatory sweat on men’s testosterone. Evolutionary Psychology, 10(4). doi: 10.1177/147470491201000404CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Samuels, C. A., Butterworth, G., Roberts, T., Graupner, L., & Hole, G. (1994). Facial aesthetics: Babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry. Perception, 23, 823831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scheflen, A. E. (1965). Quasi-courtship behavior in psychotherapy. Psychiatry, 28(3), 245257.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmalt, H. D. (2006). Waist-to-hip ratio and female physical attractiveness: The moderating role of power motivation and the mating context. Personality and Individual Differences, 41(3), 455465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. P., & Buss, D. M. (2001). Human mate poaching: Tactics and temptations for infiltrating existing mateships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80(6), 894917.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. P., & International Sexuality Description Project. (2003). Universal sex differences in the desire for sexual variety: Tests from 52 nations, 6 continents, and 13 islands. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85(1), 85104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmitt, D. P., Jonason, P. K., Byerley, G. J., Flores, S. D., Illbeck, B. E., O’Leary, K. N., & Qudrat, A. (2012). A reexamination of sex differences in sexuality: New studies reveal old truths. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(2), 135139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. P., Shackelford, T. K., Duntley, J., Tooke, W., & Buss, D. M. (2001). The desire for sexual variety as a key to understanding basic human mating strategies. Personal Relationships, 8(4), 425455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwarz, S., Klümper, L., & Hassebrauck, M. (2020). Are sex differences in mating preferences really “overrated”? The effects of sex and relationship orientation on long-term and short-term mate preferences. Evolutionary Psychological Science, 6(2), 174187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scutt, D., & Manning, J. T. (1996). Ovary and ovulation: Symmetry and ovulation in women. Human Reproduction, 11(11), 24772480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shackelford, T. K., & Larsen, R. J. (1999). Facial attractiveness and physical health. Evolution and Human Behavior, 20(1), 7176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sheets, V. L., Fredendall, L. L., & Claypool, H. M. (1997). Jealousy evocation, partner reassurance, and relationship stability: An exploration of the potential benefits of jealousy. Evolution and Human Behavior, 18, 387402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sigall, H., & Ostrove, N. (1975). Beautiful but dangerous: Effects of offender attractiveness and nature of the crime on juridic judgment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 31(3), 410414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Simmons, L. W., Firman, R. C., Rhodes, G., & Peters, M. (2004). Human sperm competition: Testis size, sperm production and rates of extrapair copulations. Animal Behaviour, 68(2), 297302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, D. (1993). Adaptive significance of female physical attractiveness: Role of waist-to-hip ratio. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 293307.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Singh, D. (2004). Mating strategies of young women: Role of physical attractiveness. Journal of Sex Research, 41, 4354.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Singh, D., & Bronstad, P. M. (2001). Female body odour is a potential cue to ovulation. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 268(1469), 797801.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, D., & Randall, P. K. (2007). Beauty is in the eye of the plastic surgeon: Waist-hip ratio (WHR) and women’s attractiveness. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 329340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, D., & Young, R. K. (1995). Body weight, waist-to-hip ratio, breast, and hips: roles in judgements of female attractiveness and desirability for relationships. Ethology and Sociobiology, 16, 483507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spence, R., Reichard, M., & Smith, C. (2013). Strategic sperm allocation and a Coolidge effect in an externally fertilizing species. Behavioral Ecology, 24(1), 8288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steiger, S., Franz, R., & Eggert, A.-K. (2008). The Coolidge effect, individual recognition and selection for distinctive cuticular signatures in a burying beetle. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 275, 18311838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stelzer, C., Desmond, S. M., & Price, J. H. (1987). Physical attractiveness and sexual activity of college students. Psychological Reports, 60, 567573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, D. N., & Szymanski, D. M. (2012). Young adult women’s reports of their male romantic partner’s pornography use as a correlate of their self-esteem, relationship quality, and sexual satisfaction. Sex Roles, 67(5–6), 257271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Strock, J. M. (2003). Theodore Roosevelt on leadership: Executive lessons from the bully pulpit. New York, NY: Crown Forum.Google Scholar
Swami, V., Stieger, S., Haubner, T., Voracek, M., & Furnham, A. (2009). Evaluating the physical attractiveness of oneself and one’s romantic partner: Individual and relationship correlates of the love-is-blind bias. Journal of Individual Differences, 30(1), 3543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swami, V., & Tovée, M. J. (2013). Men’s oppressive beliefs predict their breast size preferences in women. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 42(7), 11991207.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Symons, D. (1995). Beauty is in the adaptations of the beholder: The evolutionary psychology of human female sexual attractiveness. In Abramson, P. R. and Pinkerton, S. D. (Eds.), Sexual nature, sexual culture (pp. 80118). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Thomas, H. N., Hamm, M., Borrero, S., Hess, R., & Thurston, R. C. (2019). Body image, attractiveness, and sexual satisfaction among midlife women: A qualitative study. Journal of Women’s Health, 28(1), 100106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thornhill, R., & Gangestad, S. W. (1999a). Facial attractiveness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3(12), 452460.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thornhill, R., & Gangestad, S. W. (1999b). The scent of symmetry: A human sex pheromone that signals fitness? Evolution and Human Behavior, 20(3), 175201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thornhill, R., Gangestad, S. W., Miller, R., Scheyd, G., McCollough, J. K., & Franklin, M. (2003). Major histocompatibility complex genes, symmetry, and body scent attractiveness in men and women. Behavioral Ecology, 14(5), 668678.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thornhill, R., & Møller, A. P. (1997). Developmental stability, disease and medicine. Biological Reviews, 72(4), 497548.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tiggemann, M., & McGill, B. (2004). The role of social comparison in the effect of magazine advertisements on women’s mood and body dissatisfaction. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 23(1), 2344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tovée, M. J., Maisey, D. S., Emery, J. L., & Cornelissen, P. L. (1999). Visual cues to female physical attractiveness. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 266, 211218.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tovée, M. J., Reinhardt, S., Emery, J. L., & Cornelissen, P. L. (1998). Optimal BMI and maximal sexual attractiveness. Lancet, 352, 548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tovée, M. J., Swami, V., Furnham, A., & Mangalparsad, R. (2006). Changing perceptions of attractiveness as observers are exposed to a different culture. Evolution and Human Behavior, 27(6), 443456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tovée, M. J., Tasker, K., & Benson, P. J. (2000). Is symmetry a visual cue to attractiveness in the human female body? Evolution and Human Behavior, 21(3), 191200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Træen, B., Holmen, K., & Stigum, H. (2007). Extradyadic sexual relationships in Norway. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 36(1), 5565.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tylka, T. L., & Kroon Van Diest, A. M. (2015). You looking at her “hot” body may not be “cool” for me: Integrating male partners’ pornography use into objectification theory for women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 39(1), 6784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Valenzuela, S., Halpern, D., & Katz, J. E. (2014). Social network sites, marriage well-being and divorce: Survey and state-level evidence from the United States. Computers in Human Behavior, 36, 94101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vatsyayana, (1994). The complete Kama Sutra: The first unabridged modern translation of the classic Indian text by Vatsyayana (Danielou, A., Trans.). Rochester, VT: Park Street Press.Google Scholar
Wade, T. J. (2010). The relationships between symmetry and attractiveness and mating relevant decisions and behavior: A review. Symmetry, 2(2), 10811098.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wade, T. J., Auer, G., & Roth, T. M. (2009). What is love: Further investigation of love acts. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 3(4), 290304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wade, T. J., & Weinstein, A. B. (2011). Jealousy induction: Which tactics are perceived as most effective? Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 5(4), 231238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, T. T., Wessels, L., Hussain, G., & Merten, S. (2017). Discriminative thresholds in facial asymmetry: A review of the literature. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 37(4), 375385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weeden, J., & Sabini, J. (2005). Physical attractiveness and health in Western societies: A review. Psychological Bulletin, 131(5), 635653.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
White, G. L. (1980). Inducing jealousy: A power perspective. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 6(2), 222227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yorzinski, J. L., & Platt, M. L. (2010). Same-sex gaze attraction influences mate-choice copying in humans. PLoS One, 5(2), e9115. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009115CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zelazniewicz, A. M., & Pawlowski, B. (2011). Female breast size attractiveness for men as a function of sociosexual orientation (restricted vs. unrestricted). Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(6), 11291135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

Agnew, C. R., Van Lange, P. A. M., Rusbult, C. E., & Langston, C. A. (1998). Cognitive interdependence: Commitment and the mental representation of close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74(4), 939954.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1978). The Bowlby-Ainsworth attachment theory. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1(3), 436438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alio, A. P., Kornosky, J. L., Mbah, A. K., Marty, P. J., & Salihu, H. M. (2010). The impact of paternal involvement on feto-infant morbidity among Whites, Blacks and Hispanics. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 14(5), 735741.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barbaro, N., Boutwell, B. B., Barnes, J. C., & Shackelford, T. K. (2017a). Genetic confounding of the relationship between father-absence and age at menarche. Evolution and Human Behavior, 38, 357365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbaro, N., Boutwell, B. B., Barnes, J. C., & Shackelford, T. K. (2017b). Rethinking the transmission gap: What behavioral genetics and evolutionary psychology mean for attachment theory. A comment on Verhage et al. (2016). Psychological Bulletin, 143, 107113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barelds, D. P. H., & Barelds-Dijkstra, P. (2010). Humor in intimate relationships: Ties among sense of humor, similarity in humor and relationship quality. Humor, 23(4), 447465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bazzini, D. G., & Shaffer, D. R. (1999). Resisting temptation revisited: Devaluation versus enhancement of an attractive suitor by exclusive and nonexclusive daters. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 25(2), 162176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Betzig, L. (1989). Causes of conjugal dissolution: A cross-cultural study. Current Anthropology, 30(5), 654676.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhugra, D. (2004). Literature review: A critical update. Sexual and Relationship Therapy: Journal of the British Association for Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 19(1), 109115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Birnie, C., McClure, J. M., Lydon, J. E., & Holmberg, D. (2009). Attachment avoidance and commitment aversion: A script for relationship failure. Personal Relationships, 16(1), 7997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Botwin, M. D., Buss, D. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (1997). Personality and mate preferences: Five factors in mate selection and marital satisfaction. Journal of Personality, 65(1), 107136.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bowlby, J. (1979). The Bowlby-Ainsworth attachment theory. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 2(4), 637638.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bui, K.-V. T., Peplau, L. A., & Hill, C. T. (1996). Testing the Rusbult model of relationship commitment and stability in a 15-year study of heterosexual couples. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 22(12), 12441257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (1989). Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12(1), 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (2006). Strategies of human mating. Psychological Topics, 15(2), 239260.Google Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Barnes, M. (1986). Preferences in human mate selection. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50(3), 559570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., Goetz, C., Duntley, J. D., Asao, K., & Conroy-Beam, D. (2017). The mate switching hypothesis. Personality and Individual Differences, 104, 143149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., Larsen, R. J., Westen, D., & Semmelroth, J. (1992). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science, 3(4), 251256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (1993). Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 100(2), 204232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (2019). Mate preferences and their behavioral manifestations. Annual Review of Psychology, 70, 77110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (1997a). From vigilance to violence: Mate retention tactics in married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72(2), 346361.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., & Shackelford, T. K. (1997b). Susceptibility to infidelity in the first year of marriage. Journal of Research in Personality, 31(2), 193221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buunk, B. (1987). Conditions that promote breakups as a consequence of extradyadic involvements. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 5(3), 271284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cahill, V. A., Malouff, J. M., Little, C. W., & Schutte, N. S. (2020). Trait perspective taking and romantic relationship satisfaction: A meta-analysis. Journal of Family Psychology, 34(8), 10251035.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Campbell, W. K., & Foster, C. A. (2002). Narcissism and commitment in romantic relationships: an investment model analysis. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 28(4), 484495.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cann, A., Davis, H. B., & Zapata, C. L. (2011). Humor styles and relationship satisfaction in dating couples: Perceived versus self-reported humor styles as predictors of satisfaction. Humor, 24(1), 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cate, R. M., & Lloyd, S. A. (1992). Courtship. Sage Series on Close Relationships, 142. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. Retrieved from https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/1992-98051-000.pdfGoogle Scholar
Cherlin, A. (1977). The effect of children on marital dissolution. Demography, 14(3), 265272.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Conroy-Beam, D., Goetz, C. D., & Buss, D. M. (2016). What predicts romantic relationship satisfaction and mate retention intensity: Mate preference fulfillment or mate value discrepancies? Evolution and Human Behavior, 37(6), 440448.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (2000). Evolutionary psychology and the emotions. Handbook of Emotions, 2(2), 91115.Google Scholar
Curry, O. S., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2013). Sharing a joke: The effects of a similar sense of humor on affiliation and altruism. Evolution and Human Behavior, 34(2), 125129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davies, S., Katz, J., & Jackson, J. L. (1999). Sexual desire discrepancies: Effects on sexual and relationship satisfaction in heterosexual dating couples. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 28(6), 553567.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dawkins, R. (2016). The selfish gene. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
De Goede, I. H. A., Branje, S., van Duin, J., VanderValk, I. E., & Meeus, W. (2012). Romantic relationship commitment and its linkages with commitment to parents and friends during adolescence. Social Development, 21(3), 425442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Lenne, O., Wittevronghel, L., Vandenbosch, L., & Eggermont, S. (2019). Romantic relationship commitment and the threat of alternatives on social media. Personal Relationships. doi: 10.1111/pere.12299CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Del Giudice, M., & Belsky, J. (2010). Sex differences in attachment emerge in middle childhood: An evolutionary hypothesis. Child Development Perspectives, 4(2), 97105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeWall, C. N., Lambert, N. M., Slotter, E. B., Pond, R. S., Deckman, T., Finkel, E. J., … & Fincham, F. D. (2011). So far away from one’s partner, yet so close to romantic alternatives: Avoidant attachment, interest in alternatives, and infidelity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 101(6), 13021316.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dobrowolska, M., Groyecka-Bernard, A., Sorokowski, P., Randall, A. K., Hilpert, P., Ahmadi, K., … & Sorokowska, A. (2020). Global perspective on marital satisfaction. Sustainability: Science Practice and Policy, 12(21), 8817. doi: 10.3390/su12218817CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drigotas, S. M., Safstrom, C. A., & Gentilia, T. (1999). An investment model prediction of dating infidelity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77(3), 509524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duemmler, S. L., & Kobak, R. (2001). The development of commitment and attachment in dating relationships: Attachment security as relationship construct. Journal of Adolescence, 24(3), 401415.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ellis, B. J. (1998). The partner‐specific investment inventory: An evolutionary approach to individual differences in investment. Journal of Personality, 66(3), 383442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, B. J. (2004). Timing of pubertal maturation in girls: An integrated life history approach. Psychological Bulletin, 130(6), 920958.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ellis, B. J., Bates, J. E., Dodge, K. A., Fergusson, D. M., Horwood, L. J., Pettit, G. S., & Woodward, L. (2003). Does father absence place daughters at special risk for early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy? Child Development, 74(3), 801821.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Etcheverry, P. E., Le, B., Wu, T.-F., & Wei, M. (2013). Attachment and the investment model: Predictors of relationship commitment, maintenance, and persistence. Personal Relationships, 20(3), 546567.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flamson, T., & Barrett, H. C. (2008). The encryption theory of humor: A knowledge-based mechanism of honest signaling. Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 6(4), 261281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fletcher, G. J., Simpson, J. A., Thomas, G., & Giles, L. (1999). Ideals in intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 76(1), 7289.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gavrilets, S. (2012). Human origins and the transition from promiscuity to pair-bonding. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(25), 99239928.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Geissmann, T. (1999). Duet songs of the siamang, Hylobates syndactylus: II. Testing the pair-bonding hypothesis during a partner exchange. Behaviour, 136(8), 10051039.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Geissmann, T., & Orgeldinger, M. (2000). The relationship between duet songs and pair bonds in siamangs, Hylobates syndactylus. Animal Behaviour, 60(6), 805809.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gere, J., MacDonald, G., Joel, S., Spielmann, S. S., & Impett, E. A. (2013). The independent contributions of social reward and threat perceptions to romantic commitment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105(6), 961977.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gigerenzer, G., & Todd, P. M. (1999). Simple heuristics that make us smart. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gil-Burmann, C., Peláez, F., & Sánchez, S. (2002). Mate choice differences according to sex and age. Human Nature, 13(4), 493508.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goetz, C. D., Pillsworth, E. G., Buss, D. M., & Conroy-Beam, D. (2019). Evolutionary mismatch in mating. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 2709.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gonzaga, G. C., Campos, B., & Bradbury, T. (2007). Similarity, convergence, and relationship satisfaction in dating and married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93(1), 3448.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gonzaga, G. C., Haselton, M. G., Smurda, J., Davies, M. S., & Poore, J. C. (2008). Love, desire, and the suppression of thoughts of romantic alternatives. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(2), 119126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodfriend, W., & Agnew, C. R. (2008). Sunken costs and desired plans: Examining different types of investments in close relationships. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 34(12), 16391652.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gwinn, A. M., Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., & Maner, J. K. (2013). Pornography, relationship alternatives, and intimate extradyadic behavior. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4(6), 699704.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hall, J. A. (2013). Humor in long-term romantic relationships: The association of general humor styles and relationship-specific functions with relationship satisfaction. Western Journal of Speech Communication: WJSC, 77(3), 272292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haselton, M. G., & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error management theory: A new perspective on biases in cross-sex mind reading. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78(1), 8191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hatfield, E., & Rapson, R. L. (2010). Culture, attachment style, and romantic relationships. Attachment: Expanding the Cultural Connections, 327, 227242.Google Scholar
Hatfield, E., Singelis, T., Levine, T., Bachman, G., Muto, K., & Choo, P. (2007). Love schemas, preferences in romantic partners, and reactions to commitment. Interpersona, 1(1), 124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hazan, C., & Shaver, P. (1987). Romantic love conceptualized as an attachment process. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52(3), 511524.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hazan, C., & Shaver, P. R. (1994). Attachment as an organizational framework for research on close relationships. Psychological Inquiry, 5(1), 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirschberger, G., Srivastava, S., Marsh, P., Cowan, C. P., & Cowan, P. A. (2009). Attachment, marital satisfaction, and divorce during the first fifteen years of parenthood. Personal Relationships, 16(3), 401420.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hrdy, S. B. (2009). Preface: Allomothers across species, across cultures, and through time. In Bentley, G. & Mace, R. (Eds.), Substitute parents: Biological and social perspectives on alloparenting in human societies (pp. xixviii). New York, NY: Berghahn.Google Scholar
Hurtado, A. M., & Hill, K. R. (1992). Paternal effect on offspring survivorship among Ache and Hiwi hunter-gatherers: Implications for modeling pair-bond stability. In Hewlett, B. S. (Ed.), Father-child relations: Cultural and biosocial contexts (pp. 3155). Chicago, IL: Aldine.Google Scholar
Impett, E. A., Beals, K. P., & Peplau, L. A. (2001). Testing the investment model of relationship commitment and stability in a longitudinal study of married couples. Current Psychology, 20(4), 312326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jemmott, J. B., Ashby, K. L., & Lindenfeld, K. (1989). Romantic commitment and the perceived availability of opposite-sex persons: On loving the one you’re with. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 19(14), 11981211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Joel, S., Gordon, A. M., Impett, E. A., MacDonald, G., & Keltner, D. (2013). The things you do for me: Perceptions of a romantic partner’s investments promote gratitude and commitment. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 39(10), 13331345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, D. J., & Rusbult, C. E. (1989). Resisting temptation: Devaluation of alternative partners as a means of maintaining commitment in close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57(6), 967980.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelley, H. H., & Thibaut, J. W. (1978). Interpersonal relations: A theory of interdependence. New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., & Keefe, R. C. (1992). Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in human reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15(1), 7591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kirkpatrick, L. A., & Davis, K. E. (1994). Attachment style, gender, and relationship stability: A longitudinal analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66(3), 502512.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kokko, H., & Jennions, M. D. (2008). Parental investment, sexual selection and sex ratios. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 21(4), 919948.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lacker, T. J., Walther, A., Waldvogel, P., & Ehlert, U. (2020). Fatherhood is associated with increased infidelity and moderates the link between relationship satisfaction and infidelity. Psych, 2(4), 370384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Le, B., & Agnew, C. R. (2003). Commitment and its theorized determinants: A meta-analysis of the Investment Model. Personal Relationships, 10(1), 3757.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leikas, S., Ilmarinen, V.-J., Verkasalo, M., Vartiainen, H.-L., & Lönnqvist, J.-E. (2018). Relationship satisfaction and similarity of personality traits, personal values, and attitudes. Personality and Individual Differences, 123, 191198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, N. P., Bailey, J. M., Kenrick, D. T., & Linsenmeier, J. A. W. (2002). The necessities and luxuries of mate preferences: Testing the tradeoffs. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(6), 947955.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lieberman, D., & Hatfield, E. (2006). Passionate love: Cross-cultural and evolutionary perspectives. In Stenberg, R. J. & Weis, K. (Eds.), The new psychology of love (pp. 274297). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Lu, H. J., Wong, K.-C., & Chang, L. (2017). The association between life history strategy and mate preference in men. Personality and Individual Differences, 116, 157163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lund, M. (1985). The development of investment and commitment scales for predicting continuity of personal relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 2(1), 323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maner, J. K., Rouby, D. A., & Gonzaga, G. C. (2008). Automatic inattention to attractive alternatives: The evolved psychology of relationship maintenance. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(5), 343349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mark, K. P. (2012). The relative impact of individual sexual desire and couple desire discrepancy on satisfaction in heterosexual couples. Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 27(2), 133146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mark, K. P., & Murray, S. H. (2012). Gender differences in desire discrepancy as a predictor of sexual and relationship satisfaction in a college sample of heterosexual romantic relationships. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 38(2), 198215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marlowe, F. W. (2000). Paternal investment and the human mating system. Behavioural Processes, 51(1–3), 4561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marlowe, F. (2001). Male contribution to diet and female reproductive success among foragers. Current Anthropology, 42(5), 755760.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mattison, S. M., Scelza, B., & Blumenfield, T. (2014). Paternal investment and the positive effects of fathers among the matrilineal Mosuo of Southwest China. American Anthropologist, 116(3), 591610.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mattson, R. E., Franco-Watkins, A. M., & Cunningham, K. (2012). How do I regret thee? Let me count my alternatives: Regret and decision making in intimate relationships. Psychology, 3(09), 657665.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McConnell, M., & Moss, E. (2011). Attachment across the life span: Factors that contribute to stability and change. Australian Journal of Educational & Developmental Psychology, 11, 6077.Google Scholar
McNulty, J. K., Wenner, C. A., & Fisher, T. D. (2016). Longitudinal associations among relationship satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, and frequency of sex in early marriage. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45(1), 8597.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meltzer, A. L., McNulty, J. K., Jackson, G. L., & Karney, B. R. (2014). Sex differences in the implications of partner physical attractiveness for the trajectory of marital satisfaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(3), 418428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1998). Mate choice turns cognitive. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2(5), 190198.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, R. S. (1997). Inattentive and contented: Relationship commitment and attention to alternatives. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(4), 758766.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Monk, J. K., Vennum, A. V., Ogolsky, B. G., & Fincham, F. D. (2014). Commitment and sacrifice in emerging adult romantic relationships. Marriage & Family Review, 50(5), 416434.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Montoya, R. M., Horton, R. S., & Kirchner, J. (2008). Is actual similarity necessary for attraction? A meta-analysis of actual and perceived similarity. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 25(6), 889922.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morgan, H. J., & Shaver, P. R. (1999). Attachment processes and commitment to romantic relationships. In Adams, J. M. & Jones, W. H. (Eds.), Handbook of interpersonal commitment and relationship stability (pp. 109124). New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morgan, S. P., Lye, D. N., & Condran, G. A. (1988). Sons, daughters, and the risk of marital disruption. The American Journal of Sociology, 94(1), 110129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Myddelton, D. R. (2007). They meant well: Government project disasters. Institute of Economic Affairs Monographs, Hobart Paper No. 160. London: Institute of Economic Affairs. Retrieved from https://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=1021302Google Scholar
Oberzaucher, E., & Grammer, K. (2014). The case of Moulay Ismael—Fact or fancy? PLoS One, 9(2), e85292. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085292CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Onyishi, E. I., Sorokowski, P., & Sorokowska, A. (2012). Children and marital satisfaction in a non-Western sample: Having more children increases marital satisfaction among the Igbo people of Nigeria. Evolution and Human Behavior, 33(6), 771774.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oriña, M. M., Collins, W. A., Simpson, J. A., Salvatore, J. E., Haydon, K. C., & Kim, J. S. (2011). Developmental and dyadic perspectives on commitment in adult romantic relationships. Psychological Science, 22(7), 908915.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pillsworth, E. G. (2008). Mate preferences among the Shuar of Ecuador: Trait rankings and peer evaluations. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(4), 256267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pillsworth, E. G., & Haselton, M. G. (2006). Women’s sexual strategies: The evolution of long-term bonds and extrapair sex. Annual Review of Sex Research, 17(1), 59100.Google Scholar
Plutchik, R. E., & Conte, H. R. (Eds.). (1997). Circumplex models of personality and emotions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Priest, R. F., & Thein, M. T. (2003). Humor appreciation in marriage: Spousal similarity, assortative mating, and disaffection. Humor, 16(1), 6378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quinlan, R. J. (2003). Father absence, parental care, and female reproductive development. Evolution and Human Behavior, 24(6), 376390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rhoades, G. K., Stanley, S. M., & Markman, H. J. (2010). Should I stay or should I go? Predicting dating relationship stability from four aspects of commitment. Journal of Family Psychology, 24(5), 543550.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rusbult, C. E. (1980). Commitment and satisfaction in romantic associations: A test of the investment model. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 16(2), 172186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E. (1983). A longitudinal test of the investment model: The development (and deterioration) of satisfaction and commitment in heterosexual involvements. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 45(1), 101117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., & Buunk, B. P. (1993). Commitment processes in close relationships: An interdependence analysis. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 10(2), 175204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Johnson, D. J., & Morrow, G. D. (1986). Predicting satisfaction and commitment in adult romantic involvements: An assessment of the generalizability of the investment model. Social Psychology Quarterly, 49(1), 8189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Martz, J. M., & Agnew, C. R. (1998). The Investment Model Scale: Measuring commitment level, satisfaction level, quality of alternatives, and investment size. Personal Relationships, 5(4), 357387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sabatelli, R. M., & Cecil-Pigo, E. F. (1985). Relational interdependence and commitment in marriage. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 47(4), 931937.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scelza, B. A. (2010). Fathers’ presence speeds the social and reproductive careers of sons. Current Anthropology, 51(2), 295303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scelza, B. A., Prall, S. P., Blumenfield, T., Crittenden, A. N., Gurven, M., Kline, M., … & McElreath, R. (2020). Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous response. Nature Human Behaviour, 4(1), 2026.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schacht, R., & Bell, A. V. (2016). The evolution of monogamy in response to partner scarcity. Scientific Reports, 6, 32472. doi: 10.1038/srep32472CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmitt, D. P. (2002). Personality, attachment and sexuality related to dating relationship outcomes: Contrasting three perspectives on personal attribute interaction. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 41(Pt 4), 589610.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schoen, R. (1975). California divorce rates by age at first marriage and duration of first marriage. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 37(3), 548555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sear, R., & Mace, R. (2008). Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(1), 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sear, R., Steele, F., McGregor, I. A., & Mace, R. (2002). The effects of kin on child mortality in rural Gambia. Demography, 39(1), 4363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sened, H., Lavidor, M., Lazarus, G., Bar-Kalifa, E., Rafaeli, E., & Ickes, W. (2017). Empathic accuracy and relationship satisfaction: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Family Psychology, 31(6), 742752.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shackelford, T. K. (1998). Divorce as a consequence of spousal infidelity. In de Munck, V. C. (Ed.), Romantic love and sexual behavior (pp. 135–153). New York, NY: Praeger/Greenwood.Google Scholar
Shackelford, T. K., & Buss, D. M. (1997). Marital satisfaction in evolutionary psychological perspective. In Sternberg, J. & Hojjat, M. (Eds.), Satisfaction in close relationships (pp. 725). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Sheppard, P., & Sear, R. (2012). Father absence predicts age at sexual maturity and reproductive timing in British men. Biology Letters, 8(2), 237240.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Simao, J., & Todd, P. M. (2002). Modeling mate choice in monogamous mating systems with courtship. Adaptive Behavior, 10(2), 113136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Simpson, J. A., Gangestad, S. W., & Lerma, M. (1990). Perception of physical attractiveness: Mechanisms involved in the maintenance of romantic relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59(6), 11921201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Simpson, J. A., & Rholes, W. S. (2010). Attachment and relationships: Milestones and future directions. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 27(2), 173180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sprecher, S., & Cate, R. M. (2004). Sexual satisfaction and sexual expression as predictors of relationship satisfaction and stability. In Harvey, J. H., Wenzel, A., & Sprecher, S. (Eds.), The handbook of sexuality in close relationships (pp. 235256). Mahwah, NJ: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Stanley, S. M., Markman, H. J., & Whitton, S. W. (2002). Communication, conflict, and commitment: Insights on the foundations of relationship success from a national survey. Family Process, 41(4), 659675.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Staw, B. M. (1976). Knee-deep in the big muddy: A study of escalating commitment to a chosen course of action. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 16(1), 2744.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Symons, D. (1979). The evolution of human sexuality. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tennov, D. (1998). Love and limerence: The experience of being in love. New York, NY: Scarborough House.Google Scholar
Thaler, R. (1980). Toward a positive theory of consumer choice. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 1(1), 3960.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thibaut, J. W., & Kelley, H. H. (Eds.). (1959). The social psychology of groups. New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Thornton, A. (1977). Children and marital stability. Journal of Marriage and Family Counseling, 39(3), 531540.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tooby, J., & Cosmides, L. (1990). The past explains the present: Emotional adaptations and the structure of ancestral environments. Ethology and Sociobiology, 11(4), 375424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tran, S., & Simpson, J. A. (2009). Pro-relationship maintenance behaviors: The joint roles of attachment and commitment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97(4), 685698.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trivers, R. (1972). Parental investment and sexual selection. In Campbell, B. (Ed.), Sexual selection and the descent of man (pp. 136179). Chicago, IL: Aldine.Google Scholar
Twenge, J. M., Campbell, W. K., & Foster, C. A. (2003). Parenthood and marital satisfaction: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 65(3), 574583.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Yperen, N. W., & Buunk, B. P. (1990). A longitudinal study of equity and satisfaction in intimate relationships. European Journal of Social Psychology, 20(4), 287309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vohs, K. D., Catanese, K. R., & Baumeister, R. F. (2004). Sex in “his” versus “her” relationships. In Harvey, J. H. (Ed.), The handbook of sexuality in close relationships (pp. 455474). Mahwah, NJ: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Wade, M. J., & Shulter, S. M. (2004). Sexual selection: Harem size and the variance in male reproductive success. The American Naturalist, 164(4), E83–E89. doi: 10.1086/424531CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Waite, L. J., & Lillard, L. A. (1991). Children and marital disruption. The American Journal of Sociology, 96(4), 930953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walster, E., Walster, G. W., & Berscheid, E. (1978). Equity: Theory and research. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
Webster, G. D., Graber, J. A., Gesselman, A. N., Crosier, B. S., & Schember, T. O. (2014). A life history theory of father absence and menarche: a meta-analysis. Evolutionary Psychology, 12(2), 273294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wroblewski, E. E., Murray, C. M., Keele, B. F., Schumacher-Stankey, J. C., Hahn, B. H., & Pusey, A. E. (2009). Male dominance rank and reproductive success in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii. Animal Behaviour, 77(4), 873885.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yeh, H.-C., Lorenz, F. O., Wickrama, K. A. S., Conger, R. D., & Elder, G. H., Jr. (2006). Relationships among sexual satisfaction, marital quality, and marital instability at midlife. Journal of Family Psychology, 20(2), 339343.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yoo, H., Bartle-Haring, S., Day, R. D., & Gangamma, R. (2014). Couple communication, emotional and sexual intimacy, and relationship satisfaction. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 40(4), 275293.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhang, Q., Maner, J. K., Xu, Y., & Zheng, Y. (2017). Relational motives reduce attentional adhesion to attractive alternatives in heterosexual university students in China. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46(2), 503511.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Anderson, K. G. (2006). How well does paternity confidence match actual paternity? Current Anthropology, 47, 513520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andrews, P. W., Gangestad, S. W., Miller, G. F., Haselton, M. G., Thornhill, R., & Neale, M. C. (2008). Sex differences in detecting sexual infidelity: Results of a maximum likelihood method for analyzing the sensitivity of sex differences to underreporting. Human Nature, 19, 347373.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Apostolou, M., Aristidou, A., & Eraclide, C. (2019). Reactions to and forgiveness of infidelity: Exploring severity, length of relationship, sex, and previous experience effects. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 5, 317330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Archer, J. (2000). Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 651680.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barrett, H. C., Frederick, D. A., Haselton, M. G., & Kurzban, R. (2006). Can manipulations of cognitive load be used to test evolutionary hypotheses? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 513518.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baschnagel, J. S., & Edlund, J. E. (2016). Affective modification of the startle eyeblink response during sexual and emotional infidelity scripts. Evolutionary Psychological Science, 2, 114122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bendixen, M., Kennair, L. E. O., Kaasa Ringheim, H., Isaksen, L., Pedersen, L., Svangtun, S., … & Hagen, K. (2015). In search of moderators of sex differences in forced-choice sexual jealousy responses: Effects of 2D:4D digit ratio and relationship infidelity experiences. Nordic Psychology, 67, 272284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bendixen, M., Kennair, L. E. O., & Grøntvedt, T. V. (2018). Forgiving the unforgivable: Couples’ forgiveness and expected forgiveness of emotional and sexual infidelity from an error management theory perspective. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 12, 322335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buunk, B. P., & Dijkstra, P. (2004). Gender differences in rival characteristics that evoke jealousy in response to emotional versus sexual infidelity. Personal Relationships, 11, 395408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buunk, A. P., Massar, K., & Dijkstra, P. (2007). A social cognitive evolutionary approach to jealousy: The automatic evaluation of one’s romantic rivals. In Forgas, J., Haselton, M., & Von Hippel, W. (Eds.). Evolution and the social mind: Evolutionary psychology and social cognition. (pp. 213228). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Buss, D. M. (2013). Sexual jealousy. Psychological Topics, 22, 155182.Google Scholar
Buss, D. M. (2018). Sexual and emotional infidelity: Evolved gender differences in jealousy prove robust and replicable. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 13, 155160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (2019). Evolutionary psychology: The new science of the mind (6th ed.). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Duntley, J. D. (2011). The evolution of intimate partner violence. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 16, 411419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., Durkee, P. K., Shackelford, T. K., Bowdle, B. F., Schmitt, D. P., Brase, G. L., … & Trofimova, I. (2020). Human status criteria: Sex differences and similarities across 14 nations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 119, 979998.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., Larsen, R. J., Westen, D., & Semmelroth, J. (1992). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science, 3, 251255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (2019). Mate preferences and their behavioral manifestations. Annual Review of Psychology, 70, 77110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cann, A., & Baucom, T. R. (2004). Former partners and new rivals as threats to a relationship: Infidelity type, gender, and commitment as factors related to distress and forgiveness. Personal Relationships, 11, 305318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carpenter, C. J. (2012). Meta-analyses of sex differences in responses to sexual versus emotional infidelity: Men and women are more similar than different. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 36, 2537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeSteno, D., Bartlett, M. Y., Braverman, J., & Salovey, P. (2002). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolutionary mechanism or artifact of measurement? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83, 11031116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
DeSteno, D., Bartlett, M. Y., & Salovey, P. (2006). Constraining accommodative homunculi in evolutionary explorations of jealousy: A reply to Barrett et al. (2006). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 519523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeSteno, D. A., & Salovey, P. (1996). Genes, jealousy, and the replication of misspecified models. Psychological Science, 7, 376379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Easton, J. A., Schipper, L. D., & Shackelford, T. K. (2007). Morbid jealousy from an evolutionary psychological perspective. Evolution and Human Behavior, 28, 399402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Easton, J. A., & Shackelford, T. K. (2009). Morbid jealousy and sex differences in partner-directed violence. Human Nature, 20, 342350.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edlund, J. E., & Sagarin, B. J. (2017). Sex differences in jealousy: A 25-year retrospective. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 55, 259302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frederick, D. A., & Fales, M. R. (2016). Upset over sexual versus emotional infidelity among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual adults. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45, 175191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fussell, N. J., Rowe, A. C., & Park, J. H. (2011). Masculinised brain and romantic jealousy: Examining the association between digit ratio (2D:4D) and between- and within-sex differences. Personality and Individual Differences, 51, 107111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Geary, D. C., DeSoto, M. C., Hoard, M. K., Sheldon, M. S., & Cooper, M. L. (2001). Estrogens and relationship jealousy. Human Nature, 12, 299320.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grice, J. W., & Seely, E. (2000). The evolution of sex differences in jealousy: Failure to replicate previous results. Journal of Research in Personality, 34, 348356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamann, S., Herman, R. A., Nolan, C. L., & Wallen, K. (2004). Men and women differ in amygdala response to visual sexual stimuli. Nature Neuroscience, 7, 411416.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harris, C. R. (2000). Psychophysiological responses to imagined infidelity: The specific innate modular view of jealousy reconsidered. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 10821091.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harris, C. R. (2003a). A review of sex differences in sexual jealousy, including self-report data, psychophysiological responses, interpersonal violence, and morbid jealousy. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 7, 102128.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harris, C. R. (2003b). Factors associated with jealousy over real and imagined infidelity: An examination of the social-cognitive and evolutionary psychology perspectives. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 27, 319329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, C. R. (2005). Male and female jealousy, still more similar than different: Reply to Sagarin (2005). Personality and Social Psychology Review, 9, 7686.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kato, T. (2014a). A reconsideration of sex differences in response to sexual and emotional infidelity. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 43, 12811288.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kato, T. (2014b). Testing the sexual imagination hypothesis for gender differences in response to infidelity. BMC Research Notes, 7, 860. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-7-860CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kato, T. (2017). A review of sex differences and similarities in responses to infidelity: A meta-analytic examination. Behavioral Science Research, 55, 137149. Sporting information: KL2016–001. Retrieved from http://katolabo.web.fc2.com/KL2016-001.pdfGoogle Scholar
Kato, T. (2021a). Gender differences in response to infidelity types and rival attractiveness. Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 36, 368–384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kato, T. (2021b). Effect of relationship status on response times to sexual and romantic stimuli among Japanese undergraduates in a memory task. Archives of Sexual Behavior. doi: 10.1007/s10508-021-02149-8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuhle, B. X. (2011). Did you have sex with him? Do you love her? An in vivo test of sex differences in jealous interrogations. Personality and Individual Differences, 51, 10441047.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuhle, B. X., Smedley, K. D., & Schmitt, D. P. (2009). Sex differences in the motivation and mitigation of jealousy-induced interrogations. Personality and Individual Differences, 46, 499502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mogilski, J. K., Reeve, S. D., Nicolas, S. C. A., Donaldson, S. H., Mitchell, V. E., & Welling, L. L. M. (2019). Jealousy, consent, and compersion within monogamous and consensually non-monogamous romantic relationships. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48, 18111828.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parrott, W. G. (1991). The emotional experiences of envy and jealousy. In Salovey, P. (Ed.), The psychology of jealousy and envy (pp. 330). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Petersen, J. L., & Hyde, J. S. (2010). A meta-analytic review of research on gender differences in sexuality, 1993-2007. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 2138.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pietrzak, R. H., Laird, J. D., Stevens, D. A., & Thompson, N. S. (2002). Sex differences in human jealousy: A coordinated study of forced-choice, continuous rating-scale, and physiological responses on the same subjects. Evolution and Human Behavior, 23, 8394.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rupp, H. A., & Wallen, K. (2008). Sex differences in response to visual sexual stimuli: A review. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 37, 206218.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sagarin, B. J. (2005). Reconsidering evolved sex differences in jealousy: Comment on Harris (2003). Personality and Social Psychology Review, 9, 6275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sagarin, B. J., Becker, D. V., Guadagno, R. E., Wilkinson, W. W., & Nicastle, L. D. (2012). A reproductive threat-based model of evolved sex differences in jealousy. Evolutionary Psychology, 10, 487503.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sagarin, B. J., Martin, A. L., Coutinho, S. A., Edlund, J. E., Patel, L., Skowronski, J. J., & Zengel, B. (2012). Sex differences in jealousy: A meta-analytic examination. Evolution and Human Behavior, 33, 595614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scelza, B. A., Prall, S. P., Blumenfield, T., Crittenden, A. N., Gurven, M., Kline, M., … & McElreath, R. (2020). Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous response. Nature Human Behaviour, 4, 2026.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schützwohl, A. (2004). Which infidelity type makes you more jealous? Decision strategies in a forced-choice between sexual and emotional infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 2, 121128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schützwohl, A. (2005). Sex differences in jealousy: The processing of cues to infidelity. Evolution and Human Behavior, 26, 288299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schützwohl, A. (2006). Sex differences in jealousy: Information search and cognitive preoccupation. Personality and Individual Differences, 40, 285292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schützwohl, A. (2008). The crux of cognitive load: Constraining deliberate and effortful decision processes in romantic jealousy. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29, 127132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schützwohl, A., & Koch, S. (2004). Sex differences in jealousy: The recall of cues to sexual and emotional infidelity in personally more and less threatening context conditions. Evolution and Human Behavior, 25, 249257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shackelford, T. K., Buss, D. M., & Bennett, K. (2002). Forgiveness or breakup: Sex differences in responses to a partner’s infidelity. Cognition and Emotion, 16, 299307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Symons, D. (1979). The evolution of human sexuality. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tafoya, M. A., & Spitzberg, B. H. (2007). The dark side of infidelity: Its nature, prevalence, and communicative functions. In Spitzberg, B. H & Cupach, W. R (Eds.), The dark side of interpersonal communication (2nd ed., pp. 201242). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Takahashi, H., Matsuura, M., Yahata, N., Koeda, M., Suhara, T., & Okubo, Y. (2006). Men and women show distinct brain activations during imagery of sexual and emotional infidelity. NeuroImage, 32, 12991307.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Valentova, J. V., de Moraes, A. C., & Varella, M. A. C. (2020). Gender, sexual orientation and type of relationship influence individual differences in jealousy: A large Brazilian sample. Personality and Individual Differences, 157, 109805. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2019.109805CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wade, T. J., & Fowler, K. (2006). Sex differences in responses to sexual and emotional infidelity: Considerations of rival attractiveness and financial status. Journal of Cultural and Evolutionary Psychology, 4, 3750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walter, K. V., Conroy-Beam, D., Buss, D. M., Asao, K., Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., … & Zupančič, M. (2020). Sex differences in mate preferences across 45 countries: A large-scale replication. Psychological Science, 31, 408423.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walum, H., Larsson, H., Westberg, L., Lichtenstein, P., & Magnusson, P. K. (2013). Sex differences in jealousy: A population-based twin study in Sweden. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 16, 941947.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Abbey, A. (1982). Sex differences in attributions for friendly behavior: Do males misperceive females’ friendliness? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 42(5), 830838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Acevedo, B. P., & Aron, A. P. (2014). Romantic love, pair-bonding, and the dopaminergic reward system. In Mikulincer, M. & Shaver, P. R. (Eds.), Mechanisms of social connection: From brain to group (pp. 5570). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alexander, M. G. & Fisher, T. D. (2003). Truth and consequences: Using the bogus pipeline to examine sex differences in self‐reported sexuality. Journal of Sex Research, 40(1), 2735.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Allen, E. S., & Baucom, D. H. (2004). Adult attachment and patterns of extradyadic involvement. Family Process, 43(4), 467488.CrossRef