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25 - Oral Corrective Feedback in Content-Based Contexts

from Part VI - Contexts of Corrective Feedback and Their Effects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2021

Hossein Nassaji
Affiliation:
University of Victoria, British Columbia
Eva Kartchava
Affiliation:
Carleton University, Ottawa
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Summary

This chapter investigates oral corrective feedback (CF) in content-based contexts. Specifically, it examines how CF can play a unique and necessary role in these contexts as a means of integrating language into content instruction. However, based on studies showing teachers’ reluctance to use CF, this chapter also outlines how CF may come into direct conflict with other content-based pedagogical objectives. Owing to the great amount of diversity found among content-based contexts, this chapter considers both cross-context, CF-related issues that can inform all content-based programs as well as issues regarding CF’s use and effectiveness in specific contexts.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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