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26 - Community-Based Transition Interventions for Adolescents and Young Adults with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

from Part III - Community Psychology in Action

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2021

Caroline S. Clauss-Ehlers
Affiliation:
Long Island University, New York
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Summary

This chapter discusses the state of current community-based interventions to support adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with neurodevelopmental disabilities (with a specific focus on spina bifida, autism spectrum disorder, and intellectual disability) as they navigate the transition to adulthood. Taking a social-ecological, developmentally grounded perspective, we provide an overview of the transition to adulthood and key elements related to this process for AYAs with disabilities. Examples of evidence-based community interventions and programs across different countries are discussed. Case studies elucidate how individual, familial, cultural, and community factors can facilitate or complicate the transition process. The implications of culture around disability are also highlighted. Lastly, future directions and ways that community psychologists can incorporate these interventions to support and empower AYAs with disabilities are provided.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Cambridge Handbook of Community Psychology
Interdisciplinary and Contextual Perspectives
, pp. 539 - 561
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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