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29 - Language in children withautism spectrum disorders

from Part Five - Varieties of development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2015

Edith L. Bavin
Affiliation:
La Trobe University, Victoria
Letitia R. Naigles
Affiliation:
University of Connecticut
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

Bavin, E. L., & Naigles, L. (eds.) (2013). Atypical Language Development, special issue of Journal of Child Language, 40(1).
Fein, D. (ed.). (2011). The Neuropsychology of Autism. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Fein, D., Barton, M., Eigsti, I. M., Kelley, E., Naigles, L., Schultz, R. T., … & Tyson, K. (2013). Optimal outcome in individuals with a history of autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 54(2), 195205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mundy, P., Sullivan, L., & Mastergeorge, A. M. (2009). A parallel and distributed processing model of joint attention, social cognition and autism. Autism Research, 2(1), 221.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naigles, L., & Tovar, A. T. (2012). Portable Intermodal Preferential Looking (IPL): Investigating language comprehension in typically developing toddlers and young children with autism. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 70, e4331.Google Scholar
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