Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-gszfc Total loading time: 1.322 Render date: 2022-06-29T20:50:43.926Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - Arabic Study Abroad

Critical Contextualization and Research-Based Interventions

from Part I - Arabic Applied Linguistics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2021

Karin Ryding
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
David Wilmsen
Affiliation:
American University of Beirut
Get access

Summary

This chapter provides a critical examination of Arabic study-abroad numbers and outcomes, of recurrent problems, and of research-based interventions. Trentman’s study highlights both qualitative and quantitative assessments of students’ skills before and after the study-abroad experience, especially in oral proficiency. Arabic sociolinguistic variation has long played a destabilizing role in proficiency gain, measurement, and accuracy, and the challenge of developing networks of informal, relaxed relationships with native speakers is raised and addressed. Also addressed are the less-noted ‘ideologies’ of study abroad that focus either on a ‘touristy’ intercultural experience or on an instrumental ‘orientalist perspective’ that discourages student engagement with local communities. Research interventions such as reflective practice and ethnography projects are discussed and evaluated as ways to raise the awareness and progress of study-abroad students.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Al-Batal, M. and Belnap, R. (2006). The teaching and learning of Arabic in the United States: Realities, needs, and future directions. In M. Wahba, K., A. Taha, Z., and England, L., eds., Handbook for Arabic Language Teaching Professionals in the 21st Century. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 389–99.Google Scholar
Allen, H. W. (2010). Language‐learning motivation during short‐term study abroad: An activity theory perspective. Foreign Language Annals, 43(1), 2749.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, A. (2003). Women and cultural learning in Costa Rica: Reading the contexts. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 9, 2152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anya, U. (2017). Racialized Identities in Second Language Learning: Speaking Blackness in Brazil. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Baker-Smemoe, W., Dewey, D. P., Bown, J., and Martinsen, R. A. (2014). Variables affecting L2 gains during study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 47(3), 464–86. doi:10.1111/flan.v47.3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bataller, R. (2010). Making a request for a service in Spanish: Pragmatic development in the study abroad setting. Foreign Language Annals, 43(1), 160–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Belnap, R. K. (2008). If you build it they will come. In Ibrahim, Z. and Makhlouf, S., eds., Linguistics in an Age of Globalization: Perspectives on Arabic Language and Teaching. Cairo, Egypt: American University in Cairo Press, 5366.Google Scholar
Bown, J., Dewey, D. P., and Belnap, R. K. (2015). Student interactions during study abroad in Jordan. In Mitchell, R., McManus, K., and Tracy-Ventura, N., eds., Social Interaction, Identity, and Language Learning During Residence Abroad. EUROSLA, 199222. Retrieved from www.eurosla.org/monographs/EM04/Bown_etal.pdf.Google Scholar
Brecht, R. D., Davidson, D. E., and Ginsberg, R. B. (1995). Predictors of foreign language gain during study abroad. In Freed, B. F., ed., Second Language Acquisition in a Study Abroad Context. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 3766.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, L. (2013). Identity and honorifics use in Korean study abroad. In Kinginger, C., ed., Social and Cultural Aspects of Language Learning in Study Abroad. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 269–98.Google Scholar
Campbell, R. (2015). Life post-study abroad for the Japanese language learner. In Mitchell, R., McManus, K., and Tracy-Ventura, N., eds., Social Interaction, Identity, and Language Learning During Residence Abroad. EUROSLA, 241–62. Retrieved from www.eurosla.org/monographs/EM04/Campbell.pdf.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. D. and Shively, R. L. (2007). Acquisition of requests and apologies in Spanish and French: Impact of study abroad and strategy-building intervention. The Modern Language Journal, 91(2), 189212. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4781.2007.00540.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coleman, J. A. (2013). Researching whole people and whole lives. In Kinginger, C., ed., Social and Cultural Aspects of Language Learning in Study Abroad. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 1746.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coleman, J. A. (2015). Social circles during residence abroad: What students do, and who with. In Mitchell, R., Tracy-Ventura, N., and McManus, K., eds., Social Interaction, Identity and Language Learning During Residence Abroad. EUROSLA, 3352. www.eurosla.org/monographs/EM04/Coleman.pdf; last accessed 15 November 2020.Google Scholar
Collentine, J. (2004). The effects of learning contexts on morphosyntactic and lexical development. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 26(2), 227–48. doi:10.1017/0S027226310406204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davidson, D. E. (2010). Study abroad: When, how long, and with what results? New data from the Russian front. Foreign Language Annals, 43(1), 626. doi:10.1111/j.1944-9720.2010.01057.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeKeyser, R. (2010). Monitoring processes in Spanish as a second language during a study abroad program. Foreign Language Annals, 43(1), 8092.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dewey, D. P., Belnap, R. K., and Hillstrom, R. (2013). Social network development, language use, and language acquisition during study abroad: Arabic language learners’ perspectives. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 22, 84110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dewey, D. P., Bown, J., Baker, W., Martinsen, R. A., Gold, C., and Eggett, D. (2014). Language use in six study abroad programs: An exploratory analysis of possible predictors: Language Learning, 64(1), 3671. doi:10.1111/lang.2014.64.issue-1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Diao, W. and Trentman, E. (2016). Politicizing study abroad: Learning Arabic in Egypt and Mandarin in China. L2 Journal, 8(2), 3150. Retrieved from https://escholarship.org/uc/item/90g8r79m.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dolby, N. (2007). Reflections on nation: American undergraduates and education abroad. Journal of Studies in International Education, 11(2), 141–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Du, H. (2013). The development of Chinese fluency during study abroad in China. Modern Language Journal, 97(1), 131–43. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4781.2013.01434.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Du, H. (2015). American college students studying abroad in China: Language, identity, and self-presentation. Foreign Language Annals, 48(2), 250–66. doi:10.1111/flan.12138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Engle, L. and Engle, J. (2012). Beyond immersion: The American University Center of Provence experiment in holistic intervention. In Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., and Lou, K. H., eds., Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 284307.Google Scholar
Fernández, J. and Tapia, A. M. G. (2016). An appraisal of the Language Contact Profile as a tool to research local engagement in study abroad. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 1(2), 248–76. doi:10.1075/sar.1.2.05fer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freed, B. (2008). Second language learning in a study abroad context. In Van Deusen-Scholl, N. and Hornberger, N. H., eds., Encyclopedia of Language and Education, vol. 4: Second and Foreign Language Education. New York: Springer, 113–25.Google Scholar
Freed, B. F., Segalowitz, N., and Dewey, D. P. (2004). Context of learning and second language fluency in French: Comparing regular classroom, study abroad, and intensive domestic immersion programs. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 26(2), 275301. doi:10.1017/0S0272263104062060.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
García-Amaya, L. (2009). New findings on fluency measures across three different learning contexts. In Collentine, J. et al. eds., Selected Proceedings of the 11th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium, 6880. www.lingref.com/cpp/hls/11/paper2203.pdf; last accessed 15 November 2020.Google Scholar
Geeslin, K. L. and Gudmestad, A. (2008). The acquisition of variation in second-language Spanish: An agenda for integrating studies of the L2 sound system. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 5(2), 137157. doi:10.1558/japl.v5i2.2232.Google Scholar
George, A. (2014). Study abroad in central Spain: The development of regional phonological features. Foreign Language Annals, 47(1), 97114. doi:10.1111/flan.v47.1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gore, J. E. (2005). Dominant Beliefs and Alternative Voices: Discourse, Belief, and Gender in American Study Abroad. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Gutel, H. (2007). The home stay: A gendered perspective. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 25, 173–88.Google Scholar
Hammer, M. (2012). The Intercultural Development Inventory: A new frontier in assessment and development of intercultural competence. In Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., and Lou, K. H., eds., Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 115–36.Google Scholar
Hernández, T. A. (2010). The relationship among motivation, interaction, and the development of second language oral proficiency in a study-abroad context. The Modern Language Journal, 94(4), 600–17. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4781.2010.01053.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Housen, A., Kuiken, F., and Vedder, I. (2012). Complexity, accuracy and fluency. In Dimensions of L2 Performance and Proficiency: Complexity, Accuracy and Fluency in SLA. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Howard, M. (2012). The advanced learner’s sociolinguistic profile: On issues of individual differences, second language exposure conditions, and type of sociolinguistic variable. The Modern Language Journal, 96(1), 2033. doi:10.1111/modl.2012.96.issue-1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Howard, M., Lemée, I., and Regan, V. (2006). The L2 acquisition of a phonological variable: The case of /l/ deletion in French. Journal of French Language Studies, 16, 124. doi:10.1017/S0959269506002298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Iino, M. (2006). Norms of interaction in a Japanese homestay setting: Toward a two-way flow of linguistic and cultural resources. In DuFon, M. A. and Churchill, E., eds., Language Learners in Study Abroad Contexts. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters, 151–76.Google Scholar
Institute of International Education. (2016). Open Doors Report on international educational exchange. Retrieved from www.iie.org/opendoors.Google Scholar
Isabelli-García, C. (2006). Study abroad social networks, motivation, and attitudes: implications for second language acquisition. In DuFon, M. A. and Churchill, E., eds., Language Learners in Study Abroad Contexts. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters, 231–58.Google Scholar
Jackson, J. (2006). Ethnographic preparation for short-term study and residence in the target culture. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 30, 7798.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, J. (2008). Language, Identity and Study Abroad: Sociocultural Perspectives. Oakville, CT: Equinox Publishing.Google Scholar
Jackson, J. (2010). Intercultural Journeys: From Study to Residence Abroad. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, J. (2013). The transformation of ‘a frog in the well’: A path to a more intercultural, global mindset. In Kinginger, C., ed., Social and Cultural Aspects of Language Learning in Study Abroad. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 179206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, C. W. (2014). Exploring the microfoundations of international community: Toward a theory of enlightened nationalism. International Studies Quarterly, 58, 682705.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinginger, C. (2008). Language learning in study abroad: Case studies of Americans in France. The Modern Language Journal, 92(s1), 1124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinginger, C. (2009). Language Learning and Study Abroad: A Critical Reading of Research. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinginger, C. (2011). Enhancing language learning in study abroad. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 31, 5873. doi:10.1017/S0267190511000031.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinginger, C. (2013). Identity and language learning in study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 46(3), 339–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knight, S. M. and Schmidt-Rinehart, B. C. (2002). Enhancing the homestay: Study abroad from the host family’s perspective. Foreign Language Annals, 35(2), 190201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knouse, S. M. (2012). The acquisition of dialectal phonemes in a study abroad context: The case of the Castilian Theta. Foreign Language Annals, 45(4), 512–42. doi:10.1111/flan.12003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuntz, P. and Belnap, R. K. (2001). Beliefs about language learning held by teachers and their students at two Arabic programs abroad. Al-ʿArabiyya, 34, 91113.Google Scholar
Lane-Toomey, C. (2014). US government factors influencing an expansion of study abroad in the Middle East/North Africa. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 24, 121–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lane-Toomey, C. K. and Lane, S. R. (2012). US students study abroad in the Middle East/North Africa: Factors influencing growing numbers. Journal of Studies in International Education, 16(1), 124. doi:10.1177/1028315312447572.Google Scholar
Li, X. (2010). Sociolinguistic variation in the speech of learners of Chinese as a second language: CSL sociolinguistic variation. Language Learning, 60(2), 366408. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9922.2009.00560.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lou, K. H. and Bosley, G. W. (2012). Facilitating intercultural learning abroad: The intentional, targeted interventions model. In Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., and Lou, K. H., eds., Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 259335.Google Scholar
Magnan, S. S. and Back, M. (2007). Social interaction and linguistic gain during study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 40(1), 4361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mendelson, V. G. (2004). Hindsight is 20/20: Student perceptions of language learning and the study abroad experience. Frontiers, 10, 6383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Michelson, K. and Alvarez Valencia, J. A. (2016). Study abroad: Tourism or education? A multimodal social semiotic analysis of institutional discourses of a promotional website. Discourse and Communication, 10(3), 235–56. doi:10.1177/1750481315623893.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, R., McManus, K., and Tracy-Ventura, N. (2015). Placement type and language learning during residence abroad. In Mitchell, R., Tracy-Ventura, N., and McManus, K., eds., Social Interaction, Identity and Language Learning During Residence Abroad. EUROSLA, 115–38. Retrieved from www.eurosla.org/monographs/EM04/Mitchell_etal.pdf.Google Scholar
Modern Language Association. (2013). Language Enrollment Database 1958–2013. Retrieved 6 January 2016 from apps.mla.org/flsurvey_search; last accessed 15 November 2020.Google Scholar
O’Dowd, R. (2011). Online foreign language interaction: Moving from the periphery to the core of foreign language education? Language Teaching, 44(3), 368380. doi:10.1017/S0261444810000194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ogden, A. (2007). The view from the veranda: Understanding today’s colonial student. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 15, 3555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Petrucci, P. R. (2007). Heritage scholars in the ancestral homeland: An overlooked identity in study abroad research. Sociolinguistic Studies, 1(2), 275–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polyani, L. (1995). Language learning and living abroad: Stories from the field. In Freed, B. F., ed., Second Language Acquisition in a Study Abroad Context. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 271–92.Google Scholar
Raish, M. (2015). The acquisition of an Egyptian phonological variant by US students in Cairo. Foreign Language Annals, 48(2), 267–83. doi:10.1111/flan.12140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regan, V. (1995). The acquisition of sociolinguistic native speech norms: Effects of a year abroad on second language learners of French. In Freed, B. F., ed., Second Language Acquisition in a Study Abroad Context. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 245–67.Google Scholar
Regan, V. (1998). Sociolinguistics and language learning in a study abroad context. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 4, 6191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regan, V., Howard, M., and Lemée, I. (2009). The Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Competence in a Study Abroad Context. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Riegelhaupt, F. and Carrasco, R. L. (2000). Mexico host family reactions to a bilingual Chicana teacher in Mexico: A case study of language and culture clash. Bilingual Research Journal, 24, 405–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ringer‐Hilfinger, K. (2012). Learner acquisition of dialect variation in a study abroad context: The case of the Spanish [θ]. Foreign Language Annals, 45(3), 430–46. doi:10.111/j.1944-9720.2012.01201.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, C. (2003). Ethnography and cultural practice: Ways of learning during residence abroad. In Alred, G., Byram, M., and Fleming, M. P., eds., Intercultural Experience and Education. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters, 114–30.Google Scholar
Roberts, C., Byram, M., Barro, A., Jordan, S., and Street, B. (2001). Language Learners as Ethnographers: Introducing Cultural Processes into Advanced Language Learning. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Said, E. W. (1979). Orientalism. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
Segalowitz, N. and Freed, B. F. (2004). Context, contact, and cognition in oral fluency acquisition: Learning Spanish in at home and study abroad contexts. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 26(2), 173–99. doi:10.1017/0S0272263104062023.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shiri, S. (2013). Learners’ attitudes toward regional dialects and destination preferences in study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 46(4), 565–87. doi:10.1111/flan.v46.4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shiri, S. (2015a). Intercultural communicative competence development during and after language study abroad: Insights from Arabic. Foreign Language Annals, 48(4), 541–69. doi:10.1111/flan.v48.4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shiri, S. (2015b). The homestay in intensive language study abroad: Social networks, language socialization, and developing intercultural competence. Foreign Language Annals, 48(1), 525. doi:10.1111/flan.12127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shively, R. L. (2010). From the virtual world to the real world: A model of pragmatics instruction for study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 43(1), 105–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siegal, M. (1995). Individual differences and study abroad: Women learning Japanese in Japan. In Freed, B. F., ed., Second Language Acquisition in a Study Abroad Context. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins, 225–44.Google Scholar
Siegal, M. (1996). The role of learner subjectivity in second language sociolinguistic competency: Western women learning Japanese. Applied Linguistics, 17(3), 356–82. doi:10.1093/applin/17.3.356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taguchi, N. (2016). Learning speech style in Japanese study abroad: Learners’ knowledge of normative use and actual use. In van Compernolle, R. A. and McGregor, J., eds., Authenticity, Language and Interaction in Second Language Contexts. Tonawanda, NY: Multilingual Matters, 82108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Talburt, S. and Stewart, M. A. (1999). What’s the subject of study abroad? Race, gender, and ‘living culture’. Modern Language Journal, 83(2), 163–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trentman, E. (2012). Study Abroad in Egypt: Identity, Access, and Arabic Language Learning. Doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED545838.Google Scholar
Trentman, E. (2013a). Arabic and English during study abroad in Cairo, Egypt: Issues of access and use. Modern Language Journal, 97(2), 457–73. doi:10.1111/modl.v97.2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trentman, E. (2013b). Imagined communities and language learning during study abroad: Arabic learners in Egypt. Foreign Language Annals, 46(4), 545–64. doi:10.1111/flan.v46.4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trentman, E. (2015a). Arabic heritage learners abroad: Language use and identity negotiation. Al-ʿArabiyya, 48, 141–56.Google Scholar
Trentman, E. (2015b). Negotiating gendered identities and access to social networks during study abroad in Egypt. In Mitchell, R., McManus, K., and Tracy-Ventura, N., eds., Social Interaction, Identity and Language Learning During Residence Abroad. EUROSLA, 263–80. Retrieved from www.eurosla.org/monographs/EM04/EM04tot.pdf#page=263.Google Scholar
Trentman, E. (2017). Oral fluency, sociolinguistic competence, and language contact: Arabic learners studying abroad in Egypt. System, 69, 5464. doi:10.1016/j.system.2017.08.007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trentman, E. (2018a). Research-based interventions for language and intercultural learning. In Al-Hawary, M., ed., The Routledge Handbook of Arabic Second Language Acquisition. New York: Routledge, 303–27.Google Scholar
Trentman, E. (2018b). Study abroad Arabic programs: Issues of concern, research, and future directions. In Wahba, K. M., England, L., and Taha, Z. A., eds., Handbook for Arabic Language Teaching Professionals in the 21st Century, vol. II. New York: Routledge, 151–61.Google Scholar
Trentman, E., and Diao, W. (2017). The American gaze east: Discourses and destinations of US study abroad. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 2(2), 175205. doi:10.1075/sar.16001.tre.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Twombly, S. B., Salisbury, M. H., Tumanut, S. D., and Klute, P. (2012). Study Abroad in a New Global Century: Renewing the Promise, Refinding the Purpose. San Francisco, CA: Wiley.Google Scholar
US Department of State. (2006). National Security Language Initiative. 5 January 2006. Retrieved from www.nsliforyouth.org/.Google Scholar
Van Der Meid, J. S. (2003). Asian Americans: Factors influencing the decision to study abroad. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 9, 71110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vande Berg, M. and Paige, R. M. (2012). Why students are and are not learning abroad. In Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., and Lou, K. H., eds., Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 2960.Google Scholar
Vande Berg, M., Connor-Linton, J., and Paige, R. M. (2009). The Georgetown Consortium Project: Interventions for student learning abroad. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 18, 175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., and Lou, K. H. (eds.) (2012). Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do About It. Sterling, VA: Stylus.Google Scholar
Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilkinson, S. (2002). The omnipresent classroom during summer study abroad: American students in conversation with their French hosts. Modern Language Journal, 86(2), 157–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woolf, M. (2006). Come and see the poor people: The pursuit of exotica. Frontiers, 13, 135–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zemach-Bersin, T. (2007). Global citizenship and study abroad: It’s all about US. Critical Literacy: Theories and Practices, 1(2), 1628.Google Scholar
Zemach-Bersin, T. (2009). Selling the world: Study abroad marketing and the privatization of global citizenship. In Lewin, R., ed., The Handbook of Practice and Research on Study Abroad. New York: Routledge, 303–20.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×