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Part VI - Arabic Linguistics in Literature and Translation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2021

Karin Ryding
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
David Wilmsen
Affiliation:
American University of Beirut
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Print publication year: 2021

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