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Part XIII - Shakespeare’s Fellows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

Armin, RobertBurbage, JamesBurbage, RichardCardenioCervantes, Miguel deChetle, HenryCondell, HenryDavies, John, of HerefordDekker, ThomasDroeshout, MartinDudley, Robert, Earl of LeicesterDulwich CollegeEarl of Worcester’s MenForman, SimonGreene, RobertHerbert, William, Earl of PembrokeHeminges, WilliamJonson, BenKemp, WilliamKing’s MenKnell, WilliamKyd, ThomasLodge, ThomasLord Admiral’s MenLord Chamberlain’s MenLyly, JohnMarlowe, ChristopherMarston, JohnMiddleton, ThomasNashe, ThomasPeele, GeorgePhillips, AugustineQueen’s MenTarlton, RichardTourneur, CyrilRowe, NicholasWebster, JohnWilkins, GeorgeWriothesley, Henryballad seller“beautified”Bibleborrowingcony-catching pamphletcovenantenigmaepitaphmythologyoraclepastoralpatronagepen nameprose fictionPuritansQueen’s Menrepentance tractsrogue literatureromanceself-portraitShoreditchsyphilistragicomedytributetricksterUniversity WitsAcheley, ThomasAdmiral’s MenAeneasAlasco, AlbertusAldrich, ThomasAlleyn, EdwardAlleyn, JohnAntonio and MellidaatheismBaines, RichardBeard, ThomasBentley, JohnBishop of WinchesterBlount, EdwardBradley, WilliamBull, EleanorBurbage, RichardCambridge UniversityCanterburyChapman, GeorgeChildren of Paul’sChildren of the ChapelchivalryCorpus Christi College, CambridgeCovell, WilliamCynthia’s RevelsDekker, ThomasDeptfordDudley, Robert, Earl of LeicesterDuke HumphreyDuke of BuckinghamDutch Churchyard in Broad StreetField, RichardFlushingFolgate, NortonFrysar, IngramGager, WilliamGod’s scourgeGosson, StephenGreene, RobertGreenes Groats-worth of WitteGresshop, JohnHalliwell, EdwardHarvey, GabrielHekatompathiaHell’s Broke LooseHog LaneHolinshed, RaphaelInns of CourtJoan la PucelleJonson, BenKing Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-AvonKing’s School, CanterburyKyd, ThomaslibelLucy, WilliamLyly, JohnA Mad World, My MastersMarston, JohnMenaphonMeres, FrancisMiddleton, ThomasNashe, ThomasA New Letter of Notable ContentsNorgate, RobertOvidian poetsOxford UniversityPalladis TamiaParker, MatthewPeele, GeorgePembroke Hall, CambridgePembroke’s MenPerimedes the BlacksmithPlayes Confuted in Five ActionsPoetasterPrivy CouncilPuckering, JohnPuritanismQueen’s MenRheimsRichard, Duke of GloucesterRowlands, SamuelScadburySt. Paul’s churchyardSwift, HugoTalbot, JohnThexton, RobertThorpe, ThomasTrinity College, Cambridgeuniversity dramaWalsingham, ThomasWatson, ThomasWither, GeorgeWriothesley, Henry, Earl of SouthamptonCambridgechronologyLord Chamberlain’s MenLyly, JohnMarprelate writerssourcesHamletHaywood, ThomasKing’s MenMarlowe, ChristopherNashe, ThomasThe Spanish TragedyTassoUniversity WitsclownFuller, ThomasjestsMartin Marprelate controversyTwo Maids of More-clackebiblical dramaChildren of the ChapelChronicle Playsclassical tragedycollaborationcomedycourt dramalost worksOxford UniversityQueen’s Menpastoralsources (Shakespeare’s)University WitsallegoryBlackfriars (playhouse)boys’ companieschildren’s companiescourt comedyeuphuismprivate theatersRenaissance dramaBlackfriarsBlackfriars (playhouse)Cross KeysGlobe (playhouse)Hayes (Kent)King’s MenSouthwarkSt. Giles’s CripplegateSt. Leonard’s Shoreditchthe Theatre (playhouse)actorsBlackfriars (playhouse)First FolioFleet StreetFulhamGlobeGrocers’ CompanyKing’s MenLord Chamberlain’s MenprinterspublishersSt. Mary’s Aldermanburythe StrandAbbot, George (archbishop of Canterbury)actorsAlleyn, Edmund (father of Edward Alleyn)Alleyn, EdwardAlleyn, Joan (wife of Edward Alleyn)Alleyn, John (brother of Edward Alleyn)Apology for ActorsBacon, Sir FrancisThe Battle of Alcazarbear baitingBedlam HospitalBlackfriars (place)Blackfriars (playhouse)1 Blind Beggar of Bednal GreenBrowne, RobertCaesar, Sir JuliusCarey, Sir GeorgeCharles, Prince (later Charles I)Cholmley, JohnClink Libertycoat of armsCoke, Sir EdwardDekker, ThomasDoctor Faustus (character)Donne, Constance (second wife of Edward Alleyn)Donne, JohnDulwich (place)Dulwich CollegeDyers CompanyEdgar (character)Edmondes, Sir ThomasElizabeth IentertainmententrepreneurshipFortunatusFortune (playhouse) (First and Second)1 Fortune’s TennisFuller, ThomasGlobe (playhouse)Golding LaneHenslowe, JohnHenslowe, PhilipHeywood, ThomasHogg, RalphHope (playhouse)Infanta of Spain (Lady Mary)Innkeepers CompanyinvestorsThe Isle of DogsJames I (James VI of Scotland)The Jew of MaltaJones, InigoJonson, BenA Knack to Know a KnaveLady Elizabeth’s MenLangley, FrancisLondonLord Admiral’s MenLord Sheffield’s MenLord Strange’s MenMarlowe, ChristopherMaster of the Bears, Bulls, and Mastiff DogsMaster of the Royal GameMeade, JacobThe Merchant of VeniceMiddlesexMiddleton, ThomasMuly Mahomet (character)Palsgrave’s MenPatient GrissellplaguePorter’s HallPrince Henry’s MenPrince of DenmarkPrivy CouncilPuddle WharfPye InnRose (playhouse)Rosseter, PhilipRoyal CourtRoyal OrdinanceSt. Botolph’s BishopsgateSt. Giles’s CripplegateSt. Paul’s CathedralSt. Saviour’s SouthwarkShylockThe Shomaker’s Holiday1 Sir John OldcastleSouthwarkstage machinerySussexSwan (playhouse)Tamburlaine (character)I, II Tamburlaine the Greatthe Theatre (playhouse)theater financierstheater managersTower of LondonWhitecross StreetWoodward, AgnesWoodward, JoanWright, JamesAmends for LadiesBlackfriars (playhouse)First FolioFletcher, JohnHamletKing’s MenLady Elizabeth’s CompanyQuarto 1A Woman is a WeathercockBurbage, RichardclowndancerdancingfoolGlobe (playhouse)jigKemp, WilliamLord Chamberlain’s MenThe CaptainChapman, GeorgeGlorianaThe Knight of the Burning Pestle“Lutes, Viols, and Voices”masque(s)The WitchThe AlchemistAll’s Well That Ends WellAmiensArmin, JohnArmin, Robertartificial foolAs You Like ItAutolycusBalthasarBlackfriars (playhouse)“Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind”Blue JohnBuffone, CarloBurbage, RichardChildren of the King’s Majesty’s Revelsclown“Come Away, Come Away, Death”countertenorCurtain (playhouse)Davies, John, of HerefordDogberryDrugger, AbelEvery Man Out of His Humour“Farewell, Dear Heart”FesteFirst ClownFool“Fools Had Ne’er Less Grace”Hall, JosephHamlet“He That Has and a Little Tiny Wit”“Hey Robin”The History of the Two Maids of More-Clacke“Hold Thy Peace”The Italian Taylor, and His Boy“It Was a Lover and His Lass”Jester“Jog On, Jog On”Jonson, BenKemp, WilliamKing Henry VIIIKing Lear“King Salomon”King’s MenLavatchLord Chamberlain’s MenLord ChandosMacbeth“A Maiden Sitting All Alone”The MalcontentMorley, Thomas“Mortall Downe, Thistle Soft”Much Ado about Nothingnatural foolNest of Ninnies“O Mistress Mine”PassarelloPorterQuips Upon Questions, Foole Upon FooleScourge of FollySir TopasTarlton, RichardThersites“Tom Tyler”TouchstoneTroilus and CressidaTutchTwelfth Night“Under the Greenwood Tree”The Valiant Welshman“Was This Fair Face”“What Shall He Have”“When Daffodils Begin to Peer”“When That I Was and-a Little Tiny Boy”The Winter’s TaleChapman, GeorgeclassicismDekker, ThomashumanismJonson, BenMarston, JohnmasquesatireShakespeare’s armstragedythe unitiesBlackfriars (playhouse)Children of the Queen’s Revelscollaborationthe Globe (playhouse)King’s MencoauthorshipcollaborationKing’s MenMacbethMeasure for Measuresatiresatirictextual criticismTimonTimon of AthenscollaborationInns of CourtintertextualitySmithfieldtragicomedy
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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