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Part XXVI - Shakespeare and the Performing Arts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

Bardolatryintercultural approachperformance criticismperformances serving as historical referencespostcolonial Shakespearereception theory, postmodernity and rereadings of ShakespeareShakespeare adaptations and appropriationsShakespeare and dance: ballet and musicalsShakespeare and operaShakespeare and songShakespeare and symphonic musicShakespeare and theatrical performanceShakespeare and the music in film scoresShakespeare on filmShakespeare on radioShakespeare on TVadaptationBritten, BenjaminlibrettomusicoperatranslationVerdi, GiuseppeballetBianca (Othello)courtly dancingCranko, JohnDesdemonaFeijoo, Lorenafemale identityfemale sexualitygender identityHamletHamlet (the character)homosexualityJulietKate (Taming of the Shrew)Labovitch, LarsLavrovsky, LeonidMalakhov, Vladimirmale identitymale sexualitymulticulturalismOthelloOthello (the character)politicsProkofiev, SergeiRichardson, DesmondRomeoRomeo and Julietsexual identitystage conventionsTaming of the ShrewTan, Yuan YuanTwelfth NightVoskresenskaja, SvetlanaAstaire, FredThe Band WagonBerkeley, BusbyBerlin, IrvingBolt, RanjitBranagh, KennethDoran, GregoryEnglishby, PaulGershwin, GeorgeGershwin, IraHart, LorenzJonson, BenKern, JeromeLove’s Labour’s LostThe Merry Wives of WindsorMerry Wives – The MusicalOedipus RexPorter, ColeRobinson, BillRodgers, RichardRogers, GingerRoyal Shakespeare CompanyThacker, DavidThe Two Gentlemen of VeronaWoolfenden, Guymusical narrativesonata formsymphonic musicsymphonic poemtonalitytone poemcommedia dell’arteentertainentHarlequinpantomimepopular performanceRich, JohnRichardson, SamuelRoman pantomimi dancersScala, FlamenioWeaver, JohnauthorshipChessé, BruceDerrida, JacquesGreene, RobertHamletJonson, BenmarionettesMarston, JohnMiddleton, Thomas“motions”puppetsShakes versus ShavShaw, George Bernard“theological theater”The TempestThe Two Gentlemen of Veronaambiguityambivalenceconcorddiscordduetemotionhighbrowimprovisationjazzjouissancepopularragtimerhythmscatsettingssonnetswingsyncopationvocal
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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