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Part XXV - Shakespeare and the Critics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

authorshipcommentaryjudgmentliterary criticismAdorno, Theodoraesthetics (aesthetic, aestheticism)Altman, Joel B.BanquoBardolatryBooth, StephenBrooks, CleanthBurke, KennethColeridge, Samuel TaylordeconstructionEmpson, WilliamFerdinandfigurative languageform (formal, formalism)Frye, NorthropgenreGrady, HughGreenblatt, Stephenimage (images, imagery)Johnson, SamuelLady MacbethMacbeth (the character)Macbeth (the play)MacduffmetaphorA Midsummer Night’s DreamMirandaneoclassicism (neoclassical)new aestheticism (new aestheticist)New Criticism (New Critical)new formalism (new formalist)new historicism (new historicist)organic form (organicism)Parker, PatriciaProsperopunsRestorationrhetoric (rhetorical)Romanticism (Romantic)Rymer, ThomasThe TempestVendler, HelenCavell, StanleyDerrida, JacquesEagleton, TerenceethicsgeniusHegel, Georg Wilhelm FriedrichJohnson, Samuelmoralityphilosophypoliticscultural criticismcultural turndeconstructionDerrida, Jacquesformalismlanguagelinguistic criticismlinguistic turnNew Materialismpresentismspeech act theoryWittgenstein, LudwigArendt, HannahAristotleBradley, A. C.catharsisColeridge, Samuel TaylorDaemonethosFreud, SigmundHazlitt, WilliamKnights, L. C.Lacan, JacquesmelancholypersonpersonapsychoanalysispsychologyauthorshipbiographyCallaghan, DympnaShakespeareShakespeare and religionShakespeare and sexualityShakespeare’s CatholicismShakespeare’s lifetrajectorytrendscomedyhistoryliterary criticismMarxismmaterialistpoliticalShakespearetragedyagencybisexual, colonialismconstructionismcosmopolitanismessentialismethnicityfemininityfeminismgaygenderglobalizationhistoricismhomohistoryhomosexualityhybridityidentityidentity politicsimperialismLGBT studieslesbianmasculinitymaterialismnationalitypeople of colorobjectificationOrientalismpostcolonialismpresentismqueer theoryracesexual orientationsubjectivitytransgendertranssexualunhistoricismaudiencecontextnew historicismperceptionperformancephenomenareaderreceptionscholarstraditionaffectaudience reactioncognitionemotiongeohumoral maphistorical phenomenologyhumorsneurophilosophysonnet 94
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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