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Part IV - Science and Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Print publication year: 2016

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