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Part XI - Medicine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

astrologyBanister, Johnbarber-surgeonsBright, Timothydomestic healersForman, SimonFrench poxGalenic medicineGeminus, ThomasHippocratic medicinehumoral theoryHester, JohnJorden, Edwardmedical marketplacemidwivesNapier, RichardnonnaturalsParacelsian medicineParé, AmbroiseplaguePurchas, Samuelsympathetic medicinetreacle (theriac)Vesalius, Andreaswise womenapothecarybarber-surgeondietdrugsempiricsgardenherbherbalhousehold medicinehumoral theoryhumorskeeperking’s evilking’s touchmateria medicamidwifenonnaturalsnursephysic gardenphysicianplaguerecipereceiptremediessimplesurgeonsyphiliswet nursearteriesbilebirthingbloodboodlettingbraincholergestationhearthumorslactationlivermacrocosmmenstruationmicrocosmnervesone-sex bodyphlegmpurgingsoultemperamentveinsanimalsbiologyeye diseaseFracastoro, Girolomogerm theoryHarriot, ThomasmedicineNew WorldpearlsplantsPlinysciencesongsyphilisThe TempestAristotleGalen“generation”geohumoralismgreensicknessHippocrateshumoral balanceleaky vesselsmenstruationMontaigne, MichelParé, Ambroisereligion and humorsexual pleasureable-bodiedafflictionAll’s Well That Ends WellangerAs You Like ItBibleblindnessbloodbodycharitycholercontagioncrueltydebilitydeformitydesiredestitutiondisabilitydiseasedisorderdumbepilepsyethicsfeverGalenGenesisGodHamletHenry VIhumorsimpairmentindigenceinfectioninjuryinsanityinsomniainsultJulius CaesarKing LearLaviniaMacbethmadnessmaimmasculinitymedicinemelancholymetamorphosesmiasmamoralitymutilationOthelloOvidPhilomelpassionphlegmphysiologyplaguepovertypunishmentrevengeRichard IIIRomeo and JulietsinSodomiteSonnetssufferingsympathysymptomsyphilistemperamentTitus AndronicusTwelfth NightTwo Noble Kinsmenvenereal diseaseVenus and Adonisanalysisanatomydissectionepitomemedicinerhetoricviolenceapothecariesaurum potabilebloodlettingCollege of Physicians of Londoncommon remediescompoundsdietempiricsGalenHippocrateshot bathhumoral theoryhysteriathe king’s evilmelancholymadnessParacelsusParé, Ambroisephysiciansthe “pox”purgessurgeonssyphilistherapiesvomitwitchcraftwomenwoundsastrological medicineBradley, A. C.Bright, TimothyColeridge, Samuel TaylorThe Comedy of ErrorsDu Laurens, AndréGalenic medicineGammer Gurton’s NedleGerard, JohnHamletHarsnett, Samuelherbal medicineHippocratic medicinehumoral medicineJorden, EdwardKing LearKnights, L. C.Macbethmadnessmelancholymental illnessMuir, Kennethpassionsreligious melancholyThe Spanish TragedyTheobald, LewisTwelfth NightThe Two Noble KinsmenWilde, OscarwitchcraftWright, ThomasThe Anatomy of MelancholyBurton, Robertchildrendemonic possessiondemonologydevilsThe Discoverie of Witchcraftdiseaseepilepsyfalling sicknessHarsnett, SamuelHobbes, ThomashysteriaJorden, EdwardLemnius, Levinusmelancholymental illnessSatanScot, Reginaldsuffocation of the motherviolence
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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Further reading

Almond, Philip C. Demonic Possession and Exorcism in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Almond, Philip C. The Witches of Warboys: An Extraordinary Story of Sorcery, Sadism and Satanic Possession. London: I. B. Tauris, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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