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205 - English-Speaking Audiences: Restoration and Eighteenth Century

from Part XXI - Audiences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

Sources cited

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Further reading

Davis, Tracy C., and Postlewait, Thomas. Theatricality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
Holland, Peter. The Ornament of Action: Text and Performance in Restoration Comedy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Lannep, William Van, et al., eds. The London Stage, 1660–1800. 11 vols. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1960–68.Google Scholar
Palfrey, Simon, and Stern, Tiffany. Shakespeare in Parts. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2007.Google Scholar
Peters, Julie Stone. Theatre of the Book, 1480–1880: Print, Text and Performance in Europe. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.Google Scholar
Stern, Tiffany. Rehearsal from Shakespeare to Sheridan. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000.Google Scholar
Straub, Kristina. Sexual Suspects: Eighteenth-Century Players and Sexual Ideology. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1991.Google Scholar
Styan, J. L. The English Stage: A History of Drama and Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Weimann, Robert. Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theater: Studies in the Social Dimension of Dramatic Form and Function. Ed. Schwartz, Robert. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1987.Google Scholar

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