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Part XXI - Audiences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

audience expectationsauditordress and material cultureembodimentinterculturalismliteraciesoriginal practicesplaygoerprint culturereceptionspectatoramphitheatersapplauseArmin, RobertaudienceAuthorshipclowningDekker, Thomasdrolleventgallantimprovisationindoor hallsjigsJonson, BenKemp, WilliamparticipationperformanceplaybooksreceptionstenographyTarlton, Richardtextualityactors in audienceaudienceaudience–actor interactionbenefit nightsCibber, SusannahCovent GardenDrury Laneeighteenth centuryfourth wallGarrick, Davidhalf-price admissionJewish Naturalization BillMacklin, CharlesThe Merchant of Venicepatent theatersprostitutesriotsseating backstageseating onstageShakespearean adaptationsShylockSiddons, Sarah1737 Theater Licensing ActAll the Year RoundAstor Place riotBowery TheatreHousehold WordsKean, CharlesMorley, HenryPhelps, Samuel“Report from the Select Committee on Dramatic Literature,” 1832Sadler’s WellsTheatre Regulation Act of 1843Tocqueville, Alexis deWhitman, WaltArts Council of Great Britainaudience surveysBogdanov, MichaelBradley, A. C.Brook, Petercultural tourismdirectorsHarbage, AlfredHenry VHolland, PeterJulius CaesarKennedy, DennisNew GlobeOlivier, LaurencePapp, JosephPoel, Williamdemographics of Shakespeare audiencesShakespeare as iconShakespeare in the ClassroomShakespeare’s Globe (playhouse)Shakespoptwentieth-century audiencesWanamaker, SamWelles, OrsonagingA Midsummer Night’s DreamDepartment of DefenseelderlyMacbethmilitaryNational Endowment for the Artsnursing homesoldierStill DreamingThe Bird in a CageBrowne, RobertBryan, GeorgeDekker, ThomasDresdenEarl of LeicesterElsinoreEngelische Comedien und TragedienEnglish playersFortunatusFriar Bacon and Friar BungayGettner, Johann GeorgGrazGreen, JohnGreene, RobertGryphius, AndreasHamletDuke Heinrich Julius of Braunschweig-LüneburgHeywood, ThomasHoghton, Alexander and ThomasJames I of England (James VI of Scotland)Jesuit dramaJohannes Doktor FaustKemp, WilliamKing Henry VKing’s MenKrumlov, ČeskýLeipzigLeo Armenius (1648)Leo Armenius (1650)Liebeskampff, oder Ander Theil Der Engelischen Comoedien und TragoedienLondonLord Admiral’s MenMarlowe, ChristopherMassinger, PhilipThe Merchant of VeniceMiddleton, ThomasMinstrelsMucedorusmusiciansmystery playsNyköpingThe Old Law or A New Way to Please YouPickelheringPloughman king legendsPope, ThomasPrague defenestrationpuppetryQueen’s MenRecords of Early English Drama (REED)Reynolds, RobertA Rod for Run-awaysRomeo and JulietRowley, WilliamThe Run-Away’s AnswerSachs, HansSaint DorotheaSaints’ playsSchilling, JohannShirley, JamesThe Shoemakers’ HolidaySimons, Joseph (or Simeons)Thirty Years’ WarTitus AndronicusThe Two Gentlemen of Veronavagrantsvagrancy lawsThe Virgin MartyrThe Winter’s TaleWolfenbüttelaccessibilityAmaryllis TheatreAmerican Sign Language (ASL)ASL Shakespeare Projectaudio descriptionblindCommunity College of AuroraDeafdisabilityFels, Deborah I.fingerspellingHamletHart House Theatrehearing impairmentlight-emitting diode (LED)low visionNational TheatreNovak, PeterOregon Shakespeare FestivalPeters, CynthiaRomeo and JulietRoyal Shakespeare Companysign language interpretationThe Tempesttouch tourTwelfth NightUdo, J. P.Wright-Meinhardt, Pamelaaleatoric effectanimalsantagonismattentionaudienceaudience experienceauthenticcloudscondescensionconventionsconvivialitydirect addressdissensionequally litexpert spectatorfainting1599 Globe (playhouse)historicityinteractionlaughtermaterial conditionsnegotiationopen airpigeonsreconstructionresponsetesponsivenessself-consciousnessShakespeare’s Globe (playhouse)social spaceswooningtheater conditionstouristweatherworld
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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