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Chapter 10 - Building Connection to Healthy Modes

The Healthy Adult and Happy Child Modes

from Part II - The Model of Schema Therapy in Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2023

Robert N. Brockman
Affiliation:
Australian Catholic University
Susan Simpson
Affiliation:
NHS Forth Valley and University of South Australia
Christopher Hayes
Affiliation:
Schema Therapy Institute Australia
Remco van der Wijngaart
Affiliation:
International Society of Schema Therapy
Matthew Smout
Affiliation:
University of South Australia
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Summary

Schema therapy is often characterised by its focus on maladaptive processes, healing and managing the painful and maladaptive aspects of a client’s presentation (e.g. Vulnerable Child, Detached Protector). While this may be accurate to a large extent, Jeff Young, in his seminal book, also outlined the importance of two positive modes that often require development during schema-based treatment: The Healthy Adult mode and the Happy Child mode. This chapter provides updated definitions of the Healthy Adult and Happy Child modes, before describing a therapeutic approach to building and inducing these modes for client well-being and self-regulation.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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Farrell, J, Reiss, N, Shaw, I. The schema therapy clinician’s guide: A complete resource for building and delivering individual, group and integrated schema mode treatment programs. John Wiley & Sons; 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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