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Part III - Homer in the World

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2020

Corinne Ondine Pache
Affiliation:
Trinity University, San Antonio
Casey Dué
Affiliation:
University of Houston
Susan Lupack
Affiliation:
Macquarie University, Sydney
Robert Lamberton
Affiliation:
Washington University, St Louis
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Further Reading

Introduction: Surveys and Collections of Articles: Buffière 1956; Lamberton and Keaney 1992; Richardson 1993; Lamberton 1997; Hunter 2004; Graziosi 2008a; Latacz 2008; Zimmerman 2011; Dubel et al. 2015; Hunter 2018; Manolea 2019.

The Archaic Era, 650‒450 b.c.: Burkert 1987b; West 1999; Burgess 2001; Griffiths 2008.

The Classical Era, 450‒300 b.c.: Olson and Sens 1999; Halliwell 2000; Ford 2002; Graziosi 2002.

The Hellenistic Age, 300 b.c. to 14 a.d.: Sens 2005; Hutchinson 2006; Schenkeveld 2006.

The High Roman Empire, 14‒235 a.d.: Kindstrand 1973; Zeitlin 2001; Simon 2008; Kim 2010; Hardie 2011

Further Reading

Setton 1956; Davison 1962; Weiss 1977; Marshall 1983; Beaune 1991, 226‒44; Pavano 1998; Canetta 2005; Smith 2010‒11; Desmond 2012; Desmond 2016.

Further Reading

Hunger 1955‒1956; Kraemer 1956; Vasilikopoulou 1971; Browning 1975; Lamberton 1986; Browning 1992; Haslam 1997; Pontani 2005; Kalavrezou 2009; Karanika 2011; Hilkens 2013.

Further Reading

Ricks 1989; Kreutz 2004; Can Bilsel 2007; Sharqāwī 2007; Cowe 2010; Slapčak 2011; Goldwyn 2016; Sharqāwī 2016.

Further Reading

Burrow 1993; Boitani 1994; Deloince-Louette 2001; Poliziano 2007; Psalidi 2008; Most et al. 2009; van der Laan 2009; Poliziano 2010; Psalidi 2010; Bizer 2011; Capodieci and Ford 2011; Zerba 2012; Quint 2014, ch. 2; Demetriou 2015a; Wolfe 2015; Whittington 2016; Ciccolella and Silvano 2017.

Further Reading

The indispensable analysis of F. A. Wolf on the Homeric question, including his book’s deep roots in earlier philology and literary culture, remains the translators’ introduction to Wolf 1985. Ferreri 2007 is a colossally researched investigation of this earlier period reaching back to fifteenth-century Italy; he deals mainly though not exclusively with scholarly humanists. For Homer in more polite literary circles, the classic discussion in Simonsuuri 1979 focuses on the English Enlightenment, when an elaborate cult of Homer’s personality developed. More recently, Norman 2011 presents a convincing new account of the Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns around 1700 in France, arguing that even Homer’s enthusiasts sometimes saw his poems as difficult or alien and that this sense of profound difference persisted into later depictions.

Further Reading

Shay 2002; Mendelsohn 2004; Hall 2008; Gittings 2012; Pache 2018.

Further Reading

Shay 1994; Hedges 2002; Shay 2002; Tritle 2002; Schein 2007; Hall 2008; Vandiver 2010; Sherman 2011; Meineck and Konstan 2014.

Further Reading

Doolittle 1972; Glück 1985; Graham 1987; Dodd 1992; Glück 1996; Atwood 2005; Doherty 2008.

Further Reading

Colum 1918; Joyce 1922; Palmer 1929; Matisse 1935; Giraudoux 1958; Fitzgerald 1961; Chagall 1989; Bechdel 2006; Walsh 2010.

Further Reading

Stanford [1954] 1962; Kazantzakis 1958; Seferis 1963; Elytis 1974; Cavafy 1976; Seferis 1981; Danforth 1982; Ricks 1989; Cavafy 2009.

Further Reading

Dougherty 2001; Rankine 2006; Davis 2007; Hall 2008, ch. 7; Greenwood 2010; McConnell 2013; Greenwood 2019.

Further Reading

Leutrat 2003; Winkler 2006a, 2006b; Pomeroy 2008; Verreth 2008; Dumont 2009; Myrsiades 2009; Winkler 2009, 2010; Michelakis 2013; Paul 2013; Winkler, ed. 2015; Winkler 2017b, 2017c.

Further Reading

Church 1906; Bearden 1948; Thomas 2008; Ita 2011; Bearden 2012; Doerries 2015, 2016.

Further Reading

Kakridis 1949; Kullmann 1960; Havelock 1963; Schadewaldt 1965; Parry 1971; Janko 1982; West, S. 1988; Powell 1990; Nagy 1996a; Lord 2000; West 2011a.

Further Reading

Ancient portraits of Homer: Boehringer 1939; Richter 1965; Zanker 1995; Latacz et al. 2008.

Post-antique images of Homer: Schwartz 2005; Latacz et al. 2008.

Further Reading

DeLacy 1948; Lamberton 1986; Lamberton and Keaney 1992; Long 1992; Keaney and Lamberton 1996; Russell and Konstan 2005; Lamberton 2012.

Further Reading

Richardson 1992, 1994.

Further Reading

Graziosi 2002; Beecroft 2010, 2011; Lefkowitz 2012; Bassino 2017.

Further Reading

Nardi 1949; Renucci 1954; Mazzoni 1965; Pagliaro 1967, esp. 371‒432; Martellotti 1973; Fubini 1976; Padoan 1977, esp. 170‒99; Kay 1980; Ahern 1982; Barolini 1984, esp. 228‒33; Barolini 1992, esp. 41‒60 and 105‒116; Boitani 1992; Brugnoli 1993; Seriacopi 1994, esp. 155‒91; Baldelli 1998; Hollander and Hollander 2000‒2008; Brownlee 2007; Freccero 2007; Wetherbee 2008; Baranski 2010.

Further Reading

For more detailed accounts of the Homeric Question and the Analyst and Unitarian approaches to the text, see the introduction by Adam Parry to the collected works of his father Milman Parry (1971) as well as Turner 1997. On the work of Parry and Lord, its implications, and its legacy in Homeric scholarship, see the introduction by Mitchell and Nagy to the second edition of Lord [1960] 2000, Foley 1997, and Dué and Ebbott 2010. For overviews of Neoanalysis, see Clark 1986; for the relationship between orality and Neoanalysis, see Kullmann 1991, Willcock 1997, Burgess 2006, Tsagalis 2011, and Montanari 2012.

Further Reading

Parry 1928, 1930, 1932, 1971.

Further Reading

Boase and Ruchon 1949; Boase 1977, 1978; Deloince-Louette 2001; Ford 2007; Bizer 2011; Ford and Capodieci 2011; Duché-Gavet et al. 2012; Deloince-Louette 2018.

Further Reading

Knauer 1964; Schlunk, 1974; Heinze 1993; Schmit-Neuerburg 1999; Nelis 2001; Hexter 2010; Nelis 2010; Barchiesi 2015.

Further Reading

Weil [1940] 2008; Hellman 1983; Bespaloff and Weil 2005. To see Weil’s essay discussed in its historical context, see Homer and War since 1900 and Homer in Twentieth (and Twenty-First) Century Scholarship in the present volume.

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