Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-l48q4 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-25T15:51:57.467Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

32 - Typos of 647/8

from Part II - Christological Perspectives after Constantinople II

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2022

Mark DelCogliano
Affiliation:
University of St Thomas, Minnesota
Get access

Summary

The Ekthesis had made monothelitism imperial orthodoxy in 638 and remained in force under Constans II, who assumed the throne in 641. While this doctrine was apparently popular in some regions, it faced stern opposition from North Africa, whither Maximus and his companions had fled and whence they mounted a dyothelite insurgency. Anti-imperial fervor even inspired the North African exarch Gregory in 646/7 to proclaim himself emperor against Constans II. Faced with this emergency, in 647/8 Paul, the patriarch of Constantinople, in the name of Constans II, published a compromise document known as the Typos, which in this context means something like “general instruction.” This document replaced the Ekthesis that had previously hung in the narthex of the Great Church. The Typos forbade all discussion of Christ’s activities and wills, aiming to set the clock back to the time of the fifth ecumenical council (553). However, a synod the following year (649) at the Lateran in Rome rejected both the Typos and the Ekthesis, which led to a major clash between imperial forces, on one side, and Martin of Rome, Maximus the Confessor, and their allies, on the other.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×