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Appendix 17.1 - Data sources for

from 17 - International Transactions: Real Trade and Factor Flows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2021

Stephen Broadberry
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Kyoji Fukao
Affiliation:
Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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