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1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2007

Marjorie Howes
Affiliation:
Boston College, Massachusetts
John Kelly
Affiliation:
St John's College, Oxford
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Summary

Few modern writers have had careers as long, varied, and complex as W. B. Yeats. Born in 1865, he produced works that arguably belong to each of three major literary historical periods or traditions: the Romantic, the Victorian, and the Modernist. His thought was profoundly dialectical; for nearly every truth he made or found, he also embraced a counter-truth: a proposition that contradicted the first truth, was equally true, and did not negate it. He repeatedly remade himself as a writer, as a public figure, even as a person. And yet his life and work revolved around a few central preoccupations and themes: the Ireland of his day, the occult, sexual love, and the power of art to work in and change the world. In 1938, the year before he died, he wrote “The Spur” whose speaker accuses the reader of thinking it “horrible” that an old man should be filled with “lust and rage” and retorts “They were not such a plague when I was young. / What else have I to spur me into song?” (VP591). The continuity Yeats asserts here is both genuine and false. If we turn from this poem to the early poetry expecting to see the young Yeats lusting and raging, we will be disappointed. The explicit embrace of lust and rage is a feature of Yeats's later years, when he cast himself as the wild, wicked old man to avoid settling into any of the more comfortable poses available to him: the venerable sage, the elder statesman, or the famous poet. All these roles appealed to him, and he adopted each of them at times, but he also drove himself beyond them, towards more risky personae. As he put it in “An Acre of Grass,” “My temptation is quiet. / . . . Myself must I remake” (VP 575-6).

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Marjorie Howes, Boston College, Massachusetts, John Kelly, St John's College, Oxford
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to W. B. Yeats
  • Online publication: 28 January 2007
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521650895.001
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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Marjorie Howes, Boston College, Massachusetts, John Kelly, St John's College, Oxford
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to W. B. Yeats
  • Online publication: 28 January 2007
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521650895.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Marjorie Howes, Boston College, Massachusetts, John Kelly, St John's College, Oxford
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to W. B. Yeats
  • Online publication: 28 January 2007
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521650895.001
Available formats
×