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Guide to further reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2015

Linda H. Peterson
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
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Print publication year: 2015

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  • Guide to further reading
  • Edited by Linda H. Peterson, Yale University, Connecticut
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women's Writing
  • Online publication: 05 October 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781107587823.020
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  • Guide to further reading
  • Edited by Linda H. Peterson, Yale University, Connecticut
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women's Writing
  • Online publication: 05 October 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781107587823.020
Available formats
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Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Guide to further reading
  • Edited by Linda H. Peterson, Yale University, Connecticut
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women's Writing
  • Online publication: 05 October 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781107587823.020
Available formats
×