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10 - Theatre and Science as Social Intervention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2021

Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

Chapter 10: This chapter covers a broad range of practices, from science public engagement events to collaborations between artists and scientists, theatre for young people, drama education initiatives, and global activism projects. Several case studies are examined: first, examples of exhibitions, lectures, and demonstrations focusing on Michael Faraday and the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, and on public autopsy demonstrations as well; second, arts-science collaborations, known as ‘sci-art,’ with reference particularly to the work of Y Touring; and third, theatre and activism in relation to climate change, as exemplified by Climate Change Theatre Action project. The discussion is framed within the author’s own experience as a practitioner working at the boundaries of theatre and science.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

The Autopsy. Channel 4 (UK television). Performed by Gunter von Hagens, presented by Krishnan Guru-Murthy, directed by David Coleman. Mentorn/Channel 4, London. Broadcast 21 November 2002.Google Scholar
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