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10 - The Eroica in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

from Part III - Reception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Nancy November
Affiliation:
University of Auckland
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Summary

For the first one hundred and fifty year of its existence, the Eroica was a mirror of shifting political aspirations and fears. It framed the hopes of the century as well as its disappointments. This chapter discusses the views of Richard Wagner and Hector Berlioz, as well as the opinions of Felix Weingartner and Anton von Webern. Brahms’s connection to the symphony is examined in the context of ideologies of cultural decline at the turn of the century, and the public perception of the Eroica is looked at by examining the analyses of the symphony as presented and popularised in several guidebooks to the symphonic repertoire. Throughout the chapter the connection to Napoleon and the ideals of heroism in politics and the arts functions as a recurring theme.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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