Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-7j4dq Total loading time: 0.616 Render date: 2022-09-30T17:29:02.201Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

13 - Apollinarius and the Nicene Homoousion

from Part IV - The Aftermath

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2020

Young Richard Kim
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Get access

Summary

Episcopal colleagues and later church historians praised Apollinarius of Laodicea for his adherence to the trinitarian orthodoxy articulated at the Council of Nicea and its use of the term homoousion to define the relationship between the divinity of the incarnate Son and that of his Father. However, Apollinarius and his disciples also used this term in Christological discussions concerning the relationship between Christ’s humanity and divinity. This chapter provides a detailed examination of the use of the Nicene term homoousion in the trinititarian and Christological statements of Apollinarius of Laodicea and his disciples. It then considers what prompted Apollinarius to make the move toward applying the Nicene homoousion to Christology, placing that critical moment in the late 350s and early 360s when Apollinarius may have been subject to influences from Athanasius of Alexandria and theologians in the Homoiousian movement. The chapter illuminates the links between trinitarian theology and Christology in the fourth century and what the debates about the Nicene homoousion in the Apollinarian community may have contributed to the Chalcedonian Definition of 451.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Select References

Bergjan, Silke-Petra, Gleede, Benjamin, and Heimgartner, Martin, eds. 2015. Apollinarius und seine Folgen. Studien und Texte zu Antike und Christentum 93. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brennecke, Hanns Christof. 2015. “‘Apollinaristicher Arianismus’ oder ‘arianischer Apollinarismus’ – ein Dogmengeschichtliches Konstruct? ‘Arianische’ Christologie und Apollinarius von Laodicea.” In Bergjan, Gleede, and Heimgartner, Apollinarius und seine Folgen, 7392.Google Scholar
Daley, S. J., Brian, E., ed. 2017. Leontius of Byzantium: Complete Works. Oxford Early Christian Texts. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
DelCogliano, Mark. 2008. “The Eusebian Alliance: The Case of Theodotus of Laodicea.ZAC 12(2): 250–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DelCogliano, Mark. 2011a. “George of Laodicea: A Historical Reassessment.JEH 62(4): 667–92.Google Scholar
Lietzmann, Hans, ed. (1904) 1970. Apollinaris von Laodicea und seine Schule: Texte und Untersuchungen. Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr. Reprint, Hildesheim: Georg Olms.Google Scholar
Orton, Robin, trans. 2015. St. Gregory of Nyssa: Anti-Apollinarian Writings. FC 131. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 1991. “A Study of the Kata Meros Pistis by Apollinarius of Laodicea.” Ph.D. thesis, University of Toronto.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 1994. “Apollinarian Christology and the Anti-Marcellan Tradition.JTS, n.s., 45(2): 545–68.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 2001. “Apollinarius on the Holy Spirit.StPatr 37: 571–92.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 2015. “The Circumstances of Apollinarius’s Election in Laodicea.” In Bergjan, Gleede, and Heimgartner, Apollinarius und seine Folgen, 1933.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 2016. “Eustathius of Antioch on Jesus’s Digestion.StPatr 74: 147–58.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy. 2017. “Epiphanius on Jesus’s Digestion.StPatr 96: 310.Google Scholar
Spoerl, Kelley McCarthy and Vinzent, Markus, trans. 2017. Eusebius of Caesarea: Against Marcellus and On Ecclesiastical Theology. FC 135. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press.Google Scholar
Weedman, Mark. 2007. The Trinitarian Theology of Hilary of Poitiers. Supplements to Vigiliae Christianae 89. Leiden: Brill.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×