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Part IV - Circus Studies Scholarship

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 June 2021

Gillian Arrighi
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle, New South Wales
Jim Davis
Affiliation:
University of Warwick
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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Tait, Peta, and Lavers, Katie, eds. The Routledge Circus Studies Reader. London: Routledge, 2016.Google Scholar
Peacock, Louise. ‘Battles, Blows and Blood: Pleasure and Terror in the Performance of Clown Violence.’ Comedy Studies 11, no. 1 (2019).Google Scholar
Ritter, Naomi. Art As Spectacle: Images of the Entertainer since Romanticism. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Starobinski, Jean. Portrait de l’artiste en saltimbanque. Paris: Gallimard, 2004.Google Scholar
Stoddart, Helen. Rings of Desire: Circus History and Representation. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Tait, Peta, and Lavers, Katie, eds. The Routledge Circus Studies Reader. London: Routledge, 2016.Google Scholar
Thomson, Rosemarie Garland. Extraordinary Bodies: Figuring Physical Disability in American Culture and Literature. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Welsford, Enid. The Fool: His Social and Literary History. Gloucester: Peter Smith, 1966.Google Scholar
Ylönen, Susanne C., and Keisalo, Marianna. ‘Sublime and Grotesque: Exploring the Luminal Positioning of Clowns between Oppositional Aesthetic Categories.’ Comedy Studies 11, no. 1 (2019).Google Scholar

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