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15 - Coriolanus and the Use of Power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2021

David Loewenstein
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Paul Stevens
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
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Summary

This chapter considers the contemporary social and military context of the composition of Coriolanus including civil unrest, governance, education, the influence of the classical world, and later conjecture that Shakespeare himself was a soldier. In considering the performance of the play and its afterlives, attention is paid to stage directions, sound, character, and the subsequent adaptation and appropriation of Coriolanus and his mother in other media – art, poetry, film – that focus on the military, civil, personal, and political conflicts at the heart of the play.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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Dessen, Alan C., and Thomson, Leslie. A Dictionary of Stage Directions in English Drama, 1580–1642, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
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Kahn, Coppélia. Roman Shakespeare: Warriors, Wounds, and Women, New York, Routledge, 1997.Google Scholar
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