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Part III - Transmission

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 April 2021

P. J. Finglass
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Adrian Kelly
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Further Reading

The most up-to-date treatment of Sappho’s Alexandrian edition remains Liberman 2007. For new insights provided by the ‘Newest Sappho’ into the articulation of Book 1, see Obbink 2016b, D’Alessio 2019. For the vexed issue of Sappho’s Epithalamia, the most recent contributions are Yatromanolakis 1999, Puglia 2008, and Dale 2011a. For the early reception, textual and visual, of Sappho in the fifth and fourth centuries, see Yatromanolakis 2007 and Coo. For the direct and indirect transmission of Aeolic poetry, see Nicosia 1976.

Further Reading

Janko 2005 (on the New Sappho) and Obbink 2014b (on the Newest Sappho) offer approachable guides to newly discovered papyri. The major problems with the provenance of the latter papyri are treated by Mazza 2019 and Sampson 2020; this is a fast-moving area which has attracted considerable international press attention. An outstanding account of the discovery of papyri from the nineteenth century onwards is provided by Parsons 2007.

Further Reading

DeJean 1989a remains central to this topic, as does Most 1995Greene 1996b: 11–35; both demonstrate how philological problems and the interpretation of Sappho’s life and poetry are intertwined.

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