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9 - Church and State

from Part II - Concepts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2021

Randall Lesaffer
Affiliation:
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
Janne E. Nijman
Affiliation:
Universiteit van Amsterdam
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Summary

The present article examines Grotius’ views on the relationship between church and state. He composed most of the works dealing exclusively with this theme in the years before 1618, but his later work is discussed as well. The historical and intellectual background to Grotius’ views is examined, such as the Dutch religious troubles, toleration, Jewish history and Erastianism. This is followed by Grotius’ general views on church and state as expressed in his works and his views on specific aspects, such as lawgiving, the right of resistance by the church, synods, ecclesiastical hierarchy, divine and natural law. It is concluded that Grotius held that there is only one, indivisible sovereign government, and that this is civil government: all external acts in the public space are subject to the sovereign. Abuse of this absolute power is restricted by the fact that the sovereign has to render account to God. Grotius’ lifelong ideal was that of a state based on these principles, with a Christian public church, where toleration of religious differences was practised.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Brett, A.S. and Tully, J. (eds)., Rethinking the Foundations of Modern Political Thought (Cambridge, 2010).Google Scholar
Grotiana N.S. 34 (2013): Dossier: Ordinum Pietas.Google Scholar
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Haggenmacher, P., Grotius et la doctrine de guerre juste (Paris, 1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heckel, M., Staat und Kirche nach den Lehren der evangelischen Juristen Deutschlands in der ersten Hälfte des 17. Jahrhunderts (Munich,1968).Google Scholar
Nellen, H.J. and Rabbie, E. (eds.), Hugo Grotius Theologian. Essays in Honour of G.H.M. Posthumus Meyjes (Leiden, 1994).Google Scholar
Nelson, E., The Hebrew Republic. Jewish Sources and the Transformation of European Political Thought (Cambridge, MA, 2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skinner, Q., The Foundations of Modern Political Thought (2 vols., Cambridge, 1978).Google Scholar
Solt, L.F., Church and State in Early Modern England 1509–1646 (Oxford and New York, 1990).Google Scholar

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