Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-qlrfm Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-13T06:21:06.716Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 11 - The Ordo virtutum and Benedictine Monasticism

from Part III - Music, Manuscripts, Illuminations, and Scribes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2021

Jennifer Bain
Affiliation:
Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
Get access

Summary

The Ordo virtutum (the Order of the Virtues) is a sung Latin drama that Hildegard of Bingen completed c. 1152 for her newly founded community at Rupertsberg. The drama has invited a multitude of modern responses due to the originality of its language and imagery and the many possible comparisons to her own visionary and theological writing. Yet this work is firmly grounded in the theology and liturgy of the twelfth-century Benedictine convent. This chapter examines how Hildegard draws on the Benedictine rule, the rite of the Consecration of Virgins from twelfth-century Mainz, and the processional and dramatic rituals of the medieval convent to create an embodied drama of the soul’s salvation that is specific to the female monastic experience. Hildegard further emplots the struggle for the soul’s salvation in a narrative which borrows elements from the Descensus Christi ad Infernos, a fourth-century addition to the apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus and the liturgical commemorations of its central event: Christ’s descent into, or harrowing, of hell. These texts and liturgies provide important context for understanding the dramatic situation and poetic language of the Ordo virtutum.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

Hildegard of Bingen. Lieder: Faksimile Riesencodex (Hs.2) der Hessischen Landesbibliothek Wiesbaden, fol. 466–481v, ed. Welker, Lorenz. Commentary by Michael Klaper. Elementa musicae 1. Wiesbaden: Ludwig Reichert Verlag, 1998. [Facsimile]Google Scholar
Hildegard of Bingen Ordo virtutum. In Hildegardis Bingensis: Opera minora, ed. Dronke, Peter. Corpus Christianorum Continuatio Mediaevalis 226. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007, 505521.Google Scholar
Hildegard of Bingen Ordo virtutum, ed. Davidson, Audrey Ekdahl. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 1985.Google Scholar
Hildegard of Bingen Ordo virtutum, ed. and French trans. Ricossa, Luca. Geneva: Lulu, 2013.Google Scholar
Hildegard of Bingen Ordo Virtutum: A Comparative Edition, ed. Corrigan, Vincent. Lion’s Bay, BC: Institute of Mediaeval Music, 2013.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

For a complete list of recordings of the Ordo virtutum, see the online discography of Hildegard’s music: Roberge, Pierre-F. Hildegard von Bingen (1098–1179): A Discography. Updates by Todd McComb. www.medieval.org/emfaq/composers/hildegard.htmlGoogle Scholar
Hildegard von Bingen in Portrait: Ordo Virtutum, directed by Michael Fields and Evelyn Tubb. DVD. BBC/Opus Arte OA 0874 D, 2003.Google Scholar
Sequentia. Ordo virtutum. LP and CD. Deutsche Harmonia Mundi 77051-2-RG, 1982.Google Scholar
Davidson, Audrey Ekdahl, ed. The Ordo Virtutum of Hildegard of Bingen: Critical Studies. Early Drama, Art, and Music Monograph Series, 18. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 1992.Google Scholar
Dronke, Peter. Nine Medieval Plays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Fassler, Margot E.Allegorical Architecture in Scivias: Hildegard’s Setting for the Ordo Virtutum.” Journal of the American Musicological Society 67, no. 2 (2014): 317378.Google Scholar
Norton, Michael. Liturgical Drama and the Reimagining of Medieval Theater: Early Drama, Art, and Music. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 2017.Google Scholar
Rankin, Susan. “Liturgical Drama.” In Crocker, Richard and Hiley, David, eds., The New Oxford History of Music, Vol. 2: The Early Middle Ages to 1300. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990, 310352.Google Scholar
Yardley, Ann Bagnall. Performing Piety: Musical Culture in Medieval English Nunneries. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×