Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-mqrwx Total loading time: 0.523 Render date: 2022-12-03T05:38:13.551Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

2 - Epicureanism in the Roman Republic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2009

James Warren
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Any account of philosophy in the Roman Republic must start from the events of 155 BC. The city of Athens, appealing to the Roman senate against a fine levied for its sack of Oropus, sent as ambassadors the current heads of three leading philosophy schools - the Academy, Stoa and Peripatos. The excitement generated by these philosophers during their stay in Rome was sufficient to ignite the long Roman love affair with philosophy. Roman patronage became in time a factor that few Greek philosophers could afford to ignore. Many Romans travelled, or sent their sons, to Athens to study in the metropolitan schools. But, conversely, many of the philosophers migrated towards the new centre of power, typically joining the entourage of a powerful Roman. By the mid first century BC, Rome itself had become one of the leading philosophical centres. This shift of the centre of gravity away from Athens was a gradual one, but was intensified by Sulla's crippling siege of Athens during the Mithridatic War, 88-86 BC, a critical period which, for example, saw both contenders for the headship of the Academy move the scene of their operations elsewhere - Philo of Larissa to Rome, Antiochus to Alexandria. The leading Stoic of the first century BC, Posidonius, who was frequently to be found in Rome, did not succeed to the headship of the Stoa in Athens, but eventually set up a school on the island of Rhodes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
4
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×