Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-c6lpx Total loading time: 0.774 Render date: 2022-11-29T14:36:48.814Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Part III - Engagements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2022

Alexander J. B. Hampton
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Douglas Hedley
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Selected Bibliography

Attfield, Robin. Wonder, Value, and God. Abingdon: Routledge, 2017.Google Scholar
Brady, Emily. The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carson, Rachel. A Sense of Wonder. New York: HarperPerennial, 2017.Google Scholar
Carson, Rachel. The Edge of the Sea. New York: Vintage, 1955.Google Scholar
Chignell, Andrew and Halteman, Matthew, ‘Religion and the Sublime’. In The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Edited by Costelloe, Timothy, pp. 183–202. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Cooper, Anthony Ashley (Third Earl of Shaftesbury). ‘The Moralists’ Part II. In Characteristics of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times. Edited by Klein, Lawrence E., pp. 231–338. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Daston, Lorraine and Park, Katharine. Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150–1750. New York: Zone Books, 2001.Google Scholar
Dean Moore, Kathleen. ‘The Truth of the Barnacles: Rachel Carson and the Moral Significance of Wonder’. In Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge. Edited by Sederis, Lisa H. and Moore, Kathleen Dean, pp. 267–280. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Dillard, Annie. ‘Holy the Firm’. In The Annie Dillard Reader. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994, 425–455.Google Scholar
Ellis, Fiona. God, Value, and Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fisher, Philip. Wonder, the Rainbow, and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences. Cambridge, MA, and London: Harvard University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Hepburn, Ronald W. Wonder and Other Essays. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Holland, Alan. ‘The Value Space of Meaningful Relations’. In Human-Environment Relations: Transformative Values in Theory and Practice. Edited by Brady, Emily and Phemister, Pauline, pp. 3–15. Dordrecht: Springer, 2012.Google Scholar
Kant, Immanuel. Critique of the Power of Judgment. Edited by Paul Guyer and translated by Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
McShane, Katie. ‘The Role of Awe in Environmental Ethics’. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76, no. 4, 2018: 473–484.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Muir, John. ‘A Wind-Storm in the Forests’, Mountains of California. New York: The Century Co., 1894. Accessed 20 March 2021. https://vault.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/writings/the_mountains_of_california/chapter_10.aspx. No page numbers.Google Scholar
Otto, Rudolf. The Idea of the Holy. Second edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 1950.Google Scholar
Sandler, Ronald L. Character and Environment: A Virtue-Oriented Approach to Environmental Ethics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Shapshay, Sandra. ‘Contemporary Environmental Aesthetics and the Neglect of the Sublime’. British Journal of Aesthetics, 53, no. 2 (April 2013): 181–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wall Kimmerer, Robin. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. Minneapolis, MI: Milkweed Editions, 2013.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

Barker, Margaret. Creation: A Biblical Vision for the Environment. London: Continuum, 2009.Google Scholar
du Boulay, Juliet. Cosmos, Life and Liturgy in a Greek Orthodox Village. Limini, Evia: Denise Harvey, 2009.Google Scholar
Brock, Rita Nakashima and Parker, Rebecca. Saving Paradise: How Christianity Traded Love of This World for Crucifixion and Empire. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Descola, Phillipe. Beyond Nature and Culture. Translated by Janet Lloyd. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo. London: Routledge, 1966.Google Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Leviticus as Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Geertz, Clifford. Agricultural Involution: The Process of Ecological Change in Indonesia. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1964.Google Scholar
Ingold, Tim. The Perception of the Environment: Essays on Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill. London: Routledge, 2000.Google Scholar
Latour, Bruno. We Have Never Been Modern. Translated by Catherine Porter. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Latour, Bruno. Facing Gaia: Eight Lectures on the New Climate Regime. Translated by Catherine Porter. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2017.Google Scholar
McLaughlin, Ryan Patrick. Christian Theology and the Status of Animals: The Dominant Tradition and Its Alternatives. New York: Macmillan, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Merchant, Caroline. The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology and the Scientific Revolution. New York: Harper and Row, 1980.Google Scholar
Nasr, Sayyed Hossein. Religion and the Order of Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Northcott, Michael S. The Environment and Christian Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Northcott, Michael S. ‘Killing for Philosophy and a Creaturely Theology of Nonviolence’. In Creaturely Theology: On God, Humans and Other Animals. Edited by Drummond, Celia Deane and Clough, David, pp. 231–248. London: SCM Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Northcott, Michael S. ‘Food Sovereignty from Joshua to La Via Campesina’. In Northcott, Michael S.. Place, Ecology and the Sacred, pp. 121–135. London: Bloomsbury, 2015.Google Scholar
Rappaport, Roy. Pigs for the Ancestors: Ritual in the Ecology of a New Guinea People. Second edition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1986.Google Scholar
Rappaport, Roy. Ecology and Religion in the Making of Humanity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shorter, Aylward. Jesus and the Witchdoctor: An Approach to Healing and Wholeness. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1985.Google Scholar
Smith, Mahlon H. And Taking Bread: Cerularius and the Azyme Controversy of 1054. Paris: Editions Beuchesne, 1978.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

Barbour, Ian. ‘Five Models of God and Evolution’. In Evolutionary and Molecular Biology: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Edited by Russell, Robert John, William R., Stoeger, SJ and Ayala, Francisco J., pp. 419–442. Vatican City State: Vatican Observatory, 1998.Google Scholar
Buckley, Michael J. At the Origins of Modern Atheism. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Doran, Robert. ‘Social Grace’. Method: Journal of Lonergan Studies 2.2 (Fall 2011): 131–142.Google Scholar
French, William C.Subject-Centered and Creation-Centered Paradigms in Recent Catholic Thought’, Journal of Religion 70.1 (1990): 48–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glacken, Clarence J. Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought from Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grabowski, Stanislaus J. ‘St. Augustine and the Presence of God’. Theological Studies 13.3 (1952): 336–358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haught, John F. Science & Religion: From Conflict to Conversation. New York: Paulist Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Irwin, Kevin W.The Sacramentality of Creation and the Role of Creation in Liturgy and Sacraments’. In Preserving the Creation: Environmental Theology and Ethics, eds. Irwin, Kevin W. and Pellegrino, Edmund D., pp. 67–111. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Peacocke, Arthur. Paths from Science Towards God: The End of All our Exploring. Oxford: OneWorld, 2001.Google Scholar
Pedersen, Olaf. The Book of Nature. Vatican City: Vatican Observatory Publications, 1992.Google Scholar
Rahner, Karl, and Vorgrimler, Herbert. ‘Grace’. Dictionary of Theology. Second edition. New York: Crossroad, 1990.Google Scholar
Schaefer, Jame. Theological Foundations for Environmental Ethics: Reconstructing Patristic and Medieval Concepts. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Schmitz-Moormann, Karl with James F. Salmon, SJ. Theology of Creation in an Evolutionary World. Cleveland, OH: Pilgrim Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Taylor, Charles. A Secular Age: The 1999 Gifford Lectures. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Wingren, Gustaf. The Flight from Creation. Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing, 1971.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

Dillon, John and Tolan, Daniel J., ‘The Ideas as Thoughts of God’. In Christian Platonism: A History. Edited by Hampton, Alexander J. B. and Kenney, John, pp. 34–52. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021.Google Scholar
Gaudí, Antoni. El pensament de Gaudí. Edited by Puig-Boada, Isidre. Barcelona: Dux, 1981.Google Scholar
Hampton, Alexander J. B.Ecology and the Unbuffered Self: Identity, Agency, and Authority in a Time of Pandemic’. In Pandemic, Ecology and Theology: Perspectives on COVID-19. Edited by Hampton, Alexander J. B., pp. 17–28. London: Routledge, 2020.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hampton, Alexander J. B.Platonism, Nature and Environmental Crisis’. In Christian Platonism: A History. Edited by Alexander, J. B. Hampton and Kenney, John Peter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021, 381–407.Google Scholar
Hildegard of Bingen. Liber divinorum operum I.1.2. The Book of Divine Works. Translated by Nathaniel M. Campbell. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 2018.Google Scholar
Hopkins, Gerard Manley. Poetical Works of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Edited by MacKenzie, Norman H.. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Langland, William. Piers Plowman. Translated by Ethelbert Talbot Donaldson, edited by Robertson, Elizabeth Ann and Shepherd, Stephen H. A.. New York: W.W. Norton, 2006.Google Scholar
Larisey, Peter. Light for a Cold Land: Lawren Harris’s Life and Work. Toronto: Dundurn Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Ritchey, Sara Margaret. Holy Matter: Changing Perceptions of the Material World in Late Medieval Christianity. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Thomas, Traherne, The Works of Thomas Traherne VI: Poems from the ‘Dobell Folio’, Poems of Felicity, The Ceremonial Law, Poems from the ‘Early Notebook’. Edited by Ross, Jan. Rochester, NY: Boydell & Brewer, 2014.Google Scholar
Viladesau, Richard. ‘Art and Meaning’. In Christian Platonism: A History. Edited by Hampton, Alexander J. B. and Kenney, John, pp. 408–431. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021.Google Scholar
Vilakazi, Benedict Wallet. Inkondlo kaZulu. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press, 1944.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

Barua, Ankur. The Divine Body in History: A Comparative Study of the Symbolism of Time and Embodiment in St Augustine and Rāmānuja. Bern: Peter Lang, 2009.Google Scholar
Benz, Ernst. The Mystical Sources of German Romantic Philosophy. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 1983.Google Scholar
Bonifazi, Conrad. The Soul of the World: An Account of the Inwardness of Things. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1978.Google Scholar
Chakravarti, S. C. Philosophical Foundation of Bengal Vaisnavism. Calcutta: Munshiram Manoharlal, 1969.Google Scholar
Cooper, John W. Panentheism: The Other God of the Philosophers. Ada, MI: Baker Publishing Group, 2006.Google Scholar
Eliade, Mircea. Yoga, Immortality and Freedom. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Ellard, Peter. The Sacred Cosmos, Theological, Philosophical, and Scientific Conversations in the Twelfth-Century School of Chartres. Scranton, PA: University of Scranton Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Faivre, Antoine. Theosophy, Imagination, Tradition: Studies in Western Esotericism. Translated by Christine Rhone. New York: SUNY Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Idel, Moshe. The Privileged Divine Feminine in Kabbalah. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kornblatt, Judith Deutsch. Divine Sophia: The Wisdom Writings of Vladimir Solovyov. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Richards, Robert J. The Romantic Conception of Life. Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruether, Rosemary Radford. Goddesses and the Divine Feminine. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Schmidt-Biggemann, Wilhelm. Philosophia Perennis; Historical Outlines of Western Spirituality in Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Thought. New York City: Springer Publishing, 2004.Google Scholar
Shäfer, Peter. Mirror of His Beauty: Feminine Images of God from the Bible to Early Kabbalah. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004.Google Scholar
Vassányi, Miklós. ‘Anima Mundi: The Rise of the World Soul Theory in Modern German Philosophy’. Intellectual History Review 22, no. 2 (2012). 319–321.Google Scholar
Viellard-Baron, Jean-Louis. Platon et L’Idealisme Allemand (1770–1830). Paris: Éditions Beauchesne, 1997.Google Scholar
Williamson, George S. The Longing for Myth in Germany: Religion and Aesthetic Culture from Romanticism to Nietzsche. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

Burrus, Virginia. ‘Begotten, Not Made’. Conceiving Manhood in Late Antiquity. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burrus, Virginia. Ancient Christian Ecopoetics: Cosmologies, Saints, Things. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, Elizabeth A. Reading Renunciation: Asceticism and Scripture in Early Christianity. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coakley, Sarah. God, Sexuality, and the Self: An Essay ‘On the Trinity’. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Copeland, Rebecca L. Created Being: Expanding Creedal Christology. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2020.Google Scholar
Eaton, Heather and Lorentzen, Lois Ann, eds. Ecofeminism and Globalization: Exploring Context, Culture, and Religion. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003.Google Scholar
Harrison, Peter. The Bible, Protestantism and the Rise of Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, Peter. ‘Miracles, Early Modern Science, and Rational Religion’. Church History 75 (2006): 493–510.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, Peter. The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hollywood, Amy. Acute Melancholia and Other Essays: Mysticism, History, and the Study of Religio. New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keller, Catherine. Political Theology of the Earth: Our Planetary Emergency and the Struggle for a New Public. New York: Columbia University Press, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keller, Catherine and Rubenstein, Mary-Jane. Entangled Worlds: Religion, Science, and New Materialisms. New York: Fordham University Press, 2018.Google Scholar
Latour, Bruno. Facing Gaia: Eight Lectures on the New Climactic Regime. Translated by Catherine Porter. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2017.Google Scholar
Merchant, C., The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology and the Scientific Revolution, San Francisco, CA: Harper and Row, 1980.Google Scholar
Otten, Willemien. Thinking Nature and the Nature of Thinking: From Eriugena to Emerson. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2020.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plumwood, Val. ‘Androcentrism and Anthrocentrism. Parallels and Politics’. Ethics and the Environment 1.2 (1996): 119–152.Google Scholar
Rubenstein, Mary-Jane. Pantheologies: Gods, Worlds, Monsters. New York: Columbia University Press, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Radford Ruether, Rosemary. Gaia and God: An Ecofeminist Theology of Earth Healing. San Francisco, CA: Harper, 1992.Google Scholar
Tonstad, Linn Marie. God and Difference: The Trinity, Sexuality, and the Transformation of Finitude. New York: Routledge, 2017.Google Scholar
Warren, K. J. ‘Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections’. Environmental Ethics, 9 (1987): 3–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Warren, K. J.Feminist Environmental Philosophy’, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2015 Edition). Edited by Zalta., Edward N. https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2015/entries/feminism-environmental/.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×