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Select Bibliography of Modern Works Related to the Study of Western Christian Mysticism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2012

Amy Hollywood
Affiliation:
Harvard Divinity School
Patricia Z. Beckman
Affiliation:
St Olaf College, Minnesota
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Print publication year: 2012

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