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Chapter 10 - Needs and Healthcare Costs in Old Age

An Application of the Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2021

Juanita Hoe
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Martin Orrell
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
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Summary

In industrialised countries, it is very likely that there will be a sharp rise in the number of individuals in old age in the upcoming decades. Common characteristics of these individuals include multi-morbidity or frequent doctor visits which are obviously linked to increased healthcare costs.1 Therefore, identifying the determinants associated with increased healthcare costs among individuals in old age is crucial. Knowledge regarding these factors can help to manage healthcare services.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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