Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-8kt4b Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-20T02:50:28.717Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Business and government in twentieth-century Sweden: a tale of income redistribution and rent-seeking?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 March 2010

Håkan Lindgren
Affiliation:
Stockholm School of Economics
Terry Gourvish
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Get access

Summary

Business and government as political economy: some principles

When Alice Teichova's book An Economic Background to Munich was published in 1974, it justly attracted much favourable attention. Analysing a traditional political question, the 1938 agreement between Hitler and Chamberlain in Munich, from an economic perspective, was both original and revolutionary. In clarifying how economic forces influenced (and combined with) the international political developments that resulted in the dismemberment and subsequent German occupation of Czechoslovakia, Alice Teichova adhered to a tradition within social science research that was deeply embedded in classical economic analysis. Indeed, the emerging science of economics was long referred to as ‘political economy’ and, until the ‘Jevonsian-Walrasian revolution’ of the late nineteenth century, it was characterised by a wide scope and a remarkable reliance on historical methods. With the neo-classical breakthrough, however, formal ceteris paribus modelling came to dominate the analysis, and the academic discipline of economics moved further and further away from the inductive approach. During the twentieth century, this shift in the discipline's methodological approach has been reflected in a corresponding shift from professorships in ‘political economy’ to ones in ‘economics’.

During the twentieth century, economic history as a scholarly discipline made inroads precisely because it deals with the questions of long-term economic development on which classical economists such as Adam Smith, David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill and Karl Marx focused their attention. Nonetheless, during the 1960s and early 1970s economic history faced a challenge from economics.

Type
Chapter
Information
Business and Politics in Europe, 1900–1970
Essays in Honour of Alice Teichova
, pp. 17 - 41
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×