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Selected Bibliography and Guide to Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2022

Amanda Hiner
Affiliation:
Winthrop University, South Carolina
Elizabeth Tasker Davis
Affiliation:
Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas
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Print publication year: 2022

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