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8 - Faith in Strasbourg?

Religious Freedom in the European Court of Human Rights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2021

John Witte, Jr.
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
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Summary

This chapter examines the influence of Magna Carta on the development of rights and liberties in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Originally issued by King John of England in 1215, Magna Carta and several later medieval sources set forth numerous prototypical rights and liberties that helped to shape subsequent legal developments in England, America, and the broader Commonwealth. Magna Carta inspired sixteenth-century Puritan dissenters in Elizabethan England and seventeenth-century English jurists like Sir Edward Coke and Puritan pamphleteers like John Lilburne, who advocated sweeping new rights reforms on the strength of the Charter. Magna Carta also inspired more directly the new bills of rights and liberties of several American colonies, including notably the expansive 1641 Body of Liberties of Massachusetts crafted by Nathaniel Ward, and many of the rights provisions in the American Declaration of Independence, the original state constitutions, and the US Constitution and Bill of Rights.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Blessings of Liberty
Human Rights and Religious Freedom in the Western Legal Tradition
, pp. 227 - 258
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Faith in Strasbourg?
  • John Witte, Jr., Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: The Blessings of Liberty
  • Online publication: 28 October 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108652841.010
Available formats
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Faith in Strasbourg?
  • John Witte, Jr., Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: The Blessings of Liberty
  • Online publication: 28 October 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108652841.010
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Faith in Strasbourg?
  • John Witte, Jr., Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: The Blessings of Liberty
  • Online publication: 28 October 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108652841.010
Available formats
×