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6 - Healthcare costs vs. time: trends and drivers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Affiliation:
Rice University, Houston
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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