Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-hr8xl Total loading time: 0.334 Render date: 2022-01-22T05:23:13.815Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2 - Bioengineering and technology assessment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Affiliation:
Rice University, Houston
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Littenberg, B. Technology assessment in medicine. Academic Medicine: Journal of The Association of American Medical Colleges. 1992 Jul; 67(7): 424–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deber, RB. Translating technology assessment into policy. Conceptual issues and tough choices. International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care. 1992 Winter; 8(1): 131–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Szczepura, A, Kankaanpaa, J. An Introduction to Health Technology Assessment. In: Szczepura, A, Kankaanpaa, J, eds. Assessment of Health Care Technologies. New York: John Wiley & Sons; 1996.Google Scholar
Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, 2006. June 2006 [refd AHRQ Publication No. 06–0588]; Available from: http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/pocketgd.htm
Goodman, C. A basic methodology toolkit. In: Szczepura, A, Kankaanpaa, J, eds. Assessment of Health Care Technologies. New York: John Wiley & Sons; 1996.Google Scholar
Tan-Torres, T. Technology assessment in developing countries. World Health Forum. 1995; 16(1): 74–6.Google ScholarPubMed
Cantor, SB, Ganiats, TG. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis: the optimal strategy depends on the strategy set. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 1999 Jun; 52(6): 517–22.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
,U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. 2nd edn. Alexandria, VA: International Medical Publishing; 1996.Google Scholar
,Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer. NIH Consensus Statement. 2000 November 1–3; 17(4): 1–35.
Chassin, MR, Galvin, RW. The urgent need to improve health care quality. Institute of Medicine National Roundtable on Health Care Quality. JAMA: The Journal of The American Medical Association. 1998 Sep 16; 280(11): 1000–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
,Institute of Medicine. The Chasm in Quality: Select Indicators from Recent Reports. 2006 May 30 [refd 2007 May 28]; Available from: http://www.iom.edu/?id=14991.
,Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee on Quality of Health Care in America. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2001. 337 pages.Google Scholar
,National Science Board. 2008. Science and Engineering Indicators 2008. Two volumes. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation (volume 1, NSB 08-01; volume 2, NSB 08-01A).Google Scholar
Littenberg, B. Technology assessment in medicine. Academic Medicine, 67(7), 424–428CrossRef
,Committee on Quality of Healthcare in America. (2001). Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10027.htmlGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×