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Chapter 13 - Faba Bean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Dominic Fuccillo
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
Linda Sears
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Paul Stapleton
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
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Summary

Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is an Old World legume that has been called 'poor man's meat'. China and Ethiopia are the major producers, but it also is cultivated in the Mediterranean region, northern Europe, North Africa and West Asia. Faba beans introduced to South America are mostly grown at higher elevations instead of Phaseolus beans. Australia has dramatically increased the area planted to faba bean in the past decade.

BOTANY AND DISTRIBUTION

The genus Vicia belongs to the order Rosales, suborder Rosinae, family Leguminosae and subfamily Papilionaceae and is in the tribe Vicieae (Kupicha 1981). Vicia faba is in the subgenus Vicia and section Faba.

Muratova (1931) subdivided V. faba into two subspecies: paucijuga and eu-fabae. Maxted (1993) placed V. faba in the monospecific section Faba (Miller) Ledeb. and contributed the following infraspecific classification:

  1. V. faba subsp. faba L.

  2. V. faba subsp. faba var. minor Beck

  3. V. faba subsp. faba var. equina Pers.

  4. V. faba subsp. faba var. faba L.

  5. V. faba subsp. paucijuga Murat.

The crop is known by many names in the English language: faba bean, broadbean, field bean, tick bean, horse bean. The common names of faba bean in different countries are: foul, Arabic; haba, Spanish; feve, feverole, French; chechevitza, Russian; zeindo, Chinese.

The varieties major (large-seeded), minor (small-seeded) and equina (intermediate seed size) are also used. Field beans are usually of the minor (tick beans) and equina (horse bean) types.

Type
Chapter
Information
Biodiversity in Trust
Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources in CGIAR Centres
, pp. 168 - 180
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

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  • Faba Bean
  • Edited by Dominic Fuccillo, University of Arkansas, Linda Sears, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Paul Stapleton, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
  • Book: Biodiversity in Trust
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511470851.014
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  • Faba Bean
  • Edited by Dominic Fuccillo, University of Arkansas, Linda Sears, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Paul Stapleton, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
  • Book: Biodiversity in Trust
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511470851.014
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Faba Bean
  • Edited by Dominic Fuccillo, University of Arkansas, Linda Sears, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome, Paul Stapleton, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
  • Book: Biodiversity in Trust
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511470851.014
Available formats
×