Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-b2czv Total loading time: 0.452 Render date: 2022-06-28T01:14:04.454Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Chapter 8 - Chickpea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Dominic Fuccillo
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
Linda Sears
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Paul Stapleton
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Get access

Summary

Cultivated chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is a diploid, self-pollinated, leguminous crop that ranks second in area and third in production among the pulses. It is cultivated primarily for its protein-rich seed, and the plant is an efficient symbiotic nitrogen-fixer, playing an important role in farming systems. Two types of chickpea are grown: desi, with angular and coloured seeds, primarily grown in South Asia; and kabuli, with large, owl-head shape and beige-coloured seeds, grown in the Mediterranean region. Germplasm is maintained at ICRISAT (Patancheru: 18°N, 78°E) and ICARDA (Tel Hadya: 35°5′N, 36°55′E). Before 1970, wild Cicer species were scarce, but a number of annual species accessions are now available.

BOTANY AND DISTRIBUTION

The name Cicer is of Latin origin and probably derives from the pre-Indo German kichere in the Pelagian language of the tribes populating north Greece before Greek-speaking tribes took over. Chickpea belongs to subfamily Papilionoideae, tribe Viceae Alef, but its position is sufficiently distinct to consider the Cicer genus a tribe of its own, the Cicereae Alef. (Kupicha 1977). Van der Maesen (1987) dealt with this genus in detail and listed 43 species, including 34 wild perennial species, 8 wild annual and the cultivated annual, C. arietinum. The study on chromosome count in Cicer species has been limited because of rare availability of living materials.

Type
Chapter
Information
Biodiversity in Trust
Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources in CGIAR Centres
, pp. 100 - 113
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×